Anthropology (HBA)

Anthropology (HBA)

About the Program

Anthropology is the study of humankind from its beginnings to the present day. Our program in Anthropology seeks to understand the whole panorama of human existence -- in geographic space and evolutionary time -- through comparative and holistic study.

Degree: 
Honours Bachelor of Arts
Program Options: 
Specialist,
Major,
Minor

After completing your first year, you'll be asked to confirm what program(s) you wish to study – your Programs of Study. They can be integrated in unique ways to obtain your U of T degree, but must be one of the following three combinations: one Specialist; or two Majors; or one Major and two Minors. You don't need to worry about that now, but if you'd like to learn more about this process, watch our handy video (7 min).

Admission Requirements

You apply to an admission category, which is a collection of similar programs. Once you've accepted an offer of admission to our campus, we go into greater detail about specific program and course selection options.

At the end of your first year, you will choose your program(s), which means that your first year is an excellent opportunity to explore the full breadth of offerings.

Regardless of what you study, remember that you will receive a prestigious University of Toronto degree when you graduate that tells everyone that you are ranked among the best in the world!

OUAC Application Code: 
TMS (Social Sciences)
Program Course Prerequisites: 
English
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Approximate Competitive Average: 
Mid to High 70s

The admission average is calculated with English (ENG4U) plus the next best five Grade 12 U or M courses. Meeting these minimum requirements does not guarantee you admission to the University. Admission is subject to space availability and competition.

The content in this section is based on requirements in the Ontario curriculum.

Find requirements to other common curricula:

Please visit the Admissions section of our site for full requirements.

Discover Your Potential

Sarah Hillewaert

From hip-hop to handshakes, UTM anthropologist studies youth culture in Kenya

From a secret language that parents don’t understand to the complexities of a not-so-simple handshake, U of T Mississauga anthropologist Sarah Hillewaert studies how young Kenyans negotiate the interaction between traditional and global cultures.

Madeleine Mant

Dress Code: UTM anthropologist brings history to life in the classroom

Anthropologist Madeleine Mant takes the concept of school dress codes to an entirely new level. Over the past semester, the U of T Mississauga lecturer has turned up to teach her classes wearing vintage woolen capes, Victorian dresses or a bird-like black leather plague mask.

Nunavut Hunter

Hunger in the North: UTM anthropologist Tracey Galloway believes Inuit communities have the solution

As summer ends and the cooler months near, the northerners who live along the shore of Hudson Bay, in Arviat, Nunavut, busily prepare for the fall and winter hunting seasons. Soon, beluga whale hunters will set out in boats, casting nets along the way in the hope of also catching Arctic char.

Student Experience

Courses You Would Love

Spoken

ANT206H5 • Culture and Communication

Introduction to linguistic anthropology and sociolinguistics. This includes: the issue of meaning in language, the use of language in context, the role of language in the organization of human activity, language and identity.

Strike

ANT352H5 • Protest, Power and Authority: Topics in Political Anthropology

This course explores ethnographically the social and cultural practices through which the exercise of power is legitimized, authorized, and contested.

Landscape

ANT241H5 • Anthropology and the Indigenous Peoples of Turtle Island (in Canada)

This course will examine the relationship between the field of anthropology and Indigenous people of Turtle Island. We will examine the past, present, and future manifestations of this relationship. 

Student Groups & Societies

Planning Ahead

Whether you want to land your dream job, conduct groundbreaking research, or start your own business, we can get you there. Here are resources to help you explore your career options.

Career Options

Created by our Career Centre, the Careers by Major database identifies some potential career fields, how to gain related skills and experience, and useful resources and job samples. But always remember, your program of study doesn't have to determine your career!

Program Plans

Program Plans are quick and accessible overviews of the many academic and co-curricular opportunities available to help you get the most out of your UTM experience.

Tip Sheets

The Career Centre offers dozens of tip sheets with helpful information about topics related to searching for work, planning your career, and pursuing further education.

View to the U: An eye on UTM research

View to the U is a podcast that features U of T Mississauga faculty members from a range of disciplines who will illuminate some of the inner-workings of the science labs and enlighten the social sciences and humanities hubs at UTM.

Gary Crawford

Gary Crawford: Anthropological, Archaeological and Agricultural Explorations

On this edition of VIEW to the U podcast, Professor Gary Crawford takes us on a journey through his scholarly explorations of Japan and China that span his career, the early influences that have inspired his lifelong curiosity for cultures and peoples, and the changes he has seen over his time on the U of T Mississauga campus, where he has been on faculty since 1979.

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Other Programs to Consider

Criminology, Law & Society

Criminology, Law & Society

The Criminology, Law & Society programs take an interdisciplinary approach to understanding and explaining law, crime and criminal justice. This permits students to use select courses in Anthropology, Forensic Science, Philosophy, Political Science, Sociology, Psychology, and Women and Gender Studies to satisfy program requirements.

Sociology

Sociology

Sociology thus creates theories about a broad range of human activity. Sociologists study how families work; how individuals change over the life course; how norms and laws are made, broken, enforced, and changed; how inequalities of gender, class, and race emerge, continue, and change.