2021-2022 English Courses and Descriptions

Books

*The Course Schedules below are subject to change pending enrolment changes. Detailed course descriptions by instructors are added when available and are also subject to change.

**Please consult the Registrar's Time Table for mode of delivery for courses.


First-Year Courses

Fall Term

Winter Term


Course Title: Effective Writing LEC9101

Course Code: ENG100H5F | Lecture MWF 9-10

Instructor: Matt Jones

This course provides practical tools for writing in university and beyond. Students will gain experience in generating ideas, clarifying insights, structuring arguments, composing paragraphs and sentences, critiquing and revising their writing and communicating effectively to diverse audiences. This course does not count toward any English program.

Group n/a


Course Title: Effective Writing LEC9102

Course Code: ENG100H5F | Lecture T 2-4, R 2-3

Instructor: Deanna Brooks

This course provides practical tools for writing in university and beyond. Students will gain experience in generating ideas, clarifying insights, structuring arguments, composing paragraphs and sentences, critiquing and revising their writing and communicating effectively to diverse audiences. This course does not count toward any English program.

Group n/a


Course Title: Effective Writing LEC9103

Course Code: ENG100H5F | Lecture MW 12-1, 12-2

Instructor: Geoff Bouvier

This course provides practical tools for writing in university and beyond. Students will gain experience in generating ideas, clarifying insights, structuring arguments, composing paragraphs and sentences, critiquing and revising their writing and communicating effectively to diverse audiences. This course does not count toward any English program.

Group n/a

Detailed Description by Instructor
This course is designed as a comprehensive introduction to writing in multiple scholarly and informal genres, and will provide students with the necessary foundational skills to argue and communicate effectively in writing.

Selected Major Readings: The Bedford Book of Genres: A Guide and Reader, 2nd Edition; Keys to Great Writing Revised and Expanded: Mastering the Elements of Composition and Revision; They Say/ I Say: The Moves that Matter in Academic Writing

Method of Instruction: Online synchronous

Method of Evaluation
10 Discussion Board Reading Responses: 10%
5 Mini Writing Assignments in Multiple Genres: 15%
Informative Genre Paper (2-3 pgs.): 15%
Peer Reviews of Informative Genre Paper: 15%
Persuasive Genre Paper (2-3 pgs.): 15%
Peer Reviews of Persuasive Genre Paper: 15%
Narrative Journal (10 pgs.): 15%


Course Title: Effective Writing LEC9101

Course Code: ENG100H5S | Lecture MWF 9-10

Instructor: Robin D'Souza

This course provides practical tools for writing in university and beyond. Students will gain experience in generating ideas, clarifying insights, structuring arguments, composing paragraphs and sentences, critiquing and revising their writing and communicating effectively to diverse audiences. This course does not count toward any English program.

Group n/a


Course Title: Effective Writing LEC9102

Course Code: ENG100H5S | Lecture T 1-2, R 12-2

Instructor: Marshelle Woodward

This course provides practical tools for writing in university and beyond. Students will gain experience in generating ideas, clarifying insights, structuring arguments, composing paragraphs and sentences, critiquing and revising their writing and communicating effectively to diverse audiences. This course does not count toward any English program.

Group n/a


Course Title: Effective Writing LEC9103

Course Code: ENG100H5S | Lecture M 2-3, W 2-4

Instructor

This course provides practical tools for writing in university and beyond. Students will gain experience in generating ideas, clarifying insights, structuring arguments, composing paragraphs and sentences, critiquing and revising their writing and communicating effectively to diverse audiences. This course does not count toward any English program.

Group n/a

 


Course Title: How to Read Critically

Course Code: ENG101H5F | Lecture R 9-11 | Tutorials R 11-12,  R 12-1, R 1-2, R 2-3

Instructor: Marshelle Woodward

This foundational course serves as an introduction to a wide range and variety of methods for literary and textual analysis, giving students a set of interpretive tools they can use to analyze texts in English classes and beyond. Emphasis will be on developing close, attentive reading skills as ways of thinking not just about, but through texts, and on deploying these skills effectively in essays and discussions. The class will draw on literary works from a variety of countries, centuries, genres and media. We recommend that students considering a Specialist, Major or Minor in English take this course.

Group 1 Literary Theory/Methods


Course Title: How to Research Literature

Course Code: ENG102H5S | Lecture MW 11-12 | Tutorials W 12-1, W 2-3

InstructorDaniela Janes

This foundational course serves as an introduction to conducting research for English courses at the university level. Skills taught will be: reading and engaging with arguments about literature; incorporating the arguments of others into your own; locating and evaluating secondary sources; and conducting primary research. The class will draw on literary works from a variety of countries, centuries, genres and media. The class will normally culminate in a longer research paper, developed over the course of the semester. We recommend that students considering a Specialist, Major or a Minor in English take this course.

Group n/a


Course Title: Introduction to World Literatures

Course Code: ENG105H5S | Lecture TR 11-12 | Tutorials W 12-1, W 2-3

InstructorAnna Thomas

Students will learn about contemporary creative writing in English from around the world. The course will cover the work of some famous writers, such as Toni Morrison or J.M. Coetzee, and also new and emerging authors, from Canada to New Zealand to Nigeria.

Exclusion: ENG140Y5

Group n/a


Course Title: Narrative

Course Code: ENG110H5F | Lecture MW 1-2 | Tutorials M 2-3, M 4-5, W 2-3, W 4-5

InstructorBrent Wood

This course gives students skills for analyzing the stories that shape our world: traditional literary narratives such as ballads, romances and novels, and also the kinds of stories we encounter in non-literary contexts such as journalism, movies, myths, jokes, legal judgments, travel writing, histories, songs, diaries and biographies.

Exclusion: ENG110Y5

Group n/a


Course Title: Traditions of Theatre and Drama

Course Code: ENG121H5F | Lecture MW 11-12 | Tutorials M 12-1, M 2-3

Instructor: Ben Hjorth

An introductory survey of the forms and history of world drama in its performance context from the classical period to the 19th century. May include later works influenced by historical forms and one or more plays in the Theatre Erindale schedule of production. May include a research performance component. This course is also listed as DRE121H5.

Exclusion: ENG125Y1

Group n/a


Course Title: Modern and Contemporary Theatre and Drama

Course Code: ENG122H5S | Lecture MW 11-12 | Tutorials W 12-1, W 2-3

Instructor: Nazli Akhtari

An introductory survey of the forms and history of world drama from the late 19th century to the present in its performance context. May include film adaptations and one or more plays in the Theatre Erindale schedule of productions. May include a research performance component. This course is also listed as DRE122H5.

Exclusion: ENG125Y1

Group n/a


Second-Year Courses

Fall Term

Winter Term


Course Title: British Literature in the World I: Medieval to Eighteenth-Century

Course Code: ENG202H5F | Lecture MW 10-11 | Tutorials W 11-12, W 1-2

Instructor: Liza Blake

This course serves as an introduction to influential texts that have shaped British literary history from Beowulf and Chaucer to Shakespeare, from Milton and Behn to Burney. Students will focus on questions such as the range and evolution of poetic forms, the development of the theatre and the novel and the emergence of women writers. The course will encourage students to think about the study of English literatures in relationship to history, including the history of world literatures.

Exclusion: ENG202Y5

Prerequisite: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits.

Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Group n/a

Detailed Description by Instructor
What is a world, and what does it mean for something like “British” literature to be “in” it? This course, a foundational course for the English major, offers an introduction to the major authors of almost nine centuries of British and English literature. We will see how something like “British” or “English” literature emerges out of the slow historical colonizations and recolonizations of the British Isles. But we will also see how the literature coming out of these isles imagines and describes other worlds within and without itself. We will focus especially on texts that imagine travel to other words (lands of faerie; distant lands occupied by monsters; utopias that imagine better societies; the New World of the Americas; other planets ruled by women scientists), and will think about how different genres (medieval theater, metaphysical poetry, sci-fi novels) project both author and reader beyond the worlds they typically inhabit.

Throughout the course, we will also question what it means to read literary texts as part of a broad historical survey, considering especially how our modern understandings of the nature of history might warp our perceptions of the past. As a result, we will not only consider the “origins” of British literature but also question what it means to have an origin at all. We will embed the literary works we read in their historical contexts, but also consider the way each presents its own understanding of history, examining in particular the ways that literary texts situate themselves in times and places.

Selected Major Readings:
Exeter Book Riddles; Marie de France’s lais; The Travels of Sir John Mandeville; Sir Orfeo; Geoffrey Chaucer, Canterbury Tales; The Second Shepherd’s Play; The Book of Margery Kempe; Thomas More, Utopia; Thomas Hariott, Brief and True Report of the New Found Land of Virginia; Margaret Cavendish, Blazing World; Aphra Behn, Oroonoko; Olaudah Equiano, Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano; romantic, erotic, political, and metaphysical poetry by Thomas Wyatt, Queen Elizabeth I, Mary Sidney Herbert, Philip Sidney, Mary Wroth, William Shakespeare, John Donne, George Herbert, Margaret Cavendish, Hester Pulter, Thomas Traherne, Phillis Wheatley, and more.

First Three Texts/Authors to be Studied:
Jorge Luis Borges, “Pierre Menard, Author of the Quixote”; (from) Bede, Ecclesiastical History of the English People; (from) Geoffrey of Monmouth, History of the Kings of Britain

Method of Instruction: Both lectures and tutorials. Interactive class meetings (lectures) will be run synchronously, with recorded versions available for a week after. Tutorials are default synchronous, and I strongly encourage you attend them and participate in synchronous discussions! I guarantee you that you will get the most out of the class if you attend tutorials, which should be your highest priority. We will also set up discussion boards or another means for asynchronous participation.

Method of Evaluation: Creative and analytical writing assignments; take-home quizzes; participation in discussion-oriented tutorials


Course Title: British Literature in the World II: Romantic to Contemporary

Course Code: ENG203H5S | Lecture TR 11-12 | Tutorials T 12-1, T 2-3

InstructorChris Koenig-Woodyard

An introduction to influential texts that have shaped British literary history from the Romantic period to the present, covering developments in poetry, drama and prose, from William Wordsworth to Zadie Smith and beyond. The course will address topics such as revolution and war; the increasing diversity of poetic forms; the cultural dominance of the novel; romanticism, Victorianism, modernism and postmodernism; feminism; colonialism and decolonization; the ethnic and cultural diversity of Anglophone literature in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries; literature and sexual identity; the AIDS epidemic; and technology and the digital age. The course will encourage students to think about the study of English literatures in relationship to history, including the history of world literatures.

Exclusion: ENG203Y5

Prerequisite: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits.

Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Group n/a


Course Title: How to Read Poetry

Course Code: ENG204H5F | Lecture M 3-5, W 3-4

Instructor: Brent Wood

This course gives students the tools they need to appreciate and understand poetry's traditional and experimental forms, specialized techniques and diverse ways of using language. The course asks a fundamental question for literary studies: why is poetry such an important mode of expression in so many different time periods, locations and cultures?

Exclusion: ENG201Y5

Prerequisite: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits.

Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Group 1 Literary Theory/Methods


Course Title: Rhetoric

Course Code: ENG205H5S | Lecture MWF 12-1

Instructor: Chester Scoville

An introduction to the rhetorical tradition from classical times to the present with a focus on prose as strategic persuasion. Besides rhetorical terminology, topics may include the discovery and arrangement of arguments, validity in argumentation, elements of style and rhetorical criticism and theory.

Exclusion: WRI305H5

Prerequisite: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits.

Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Group 1 Literary Theory/Methods

Detailed Description by Instructor
An introduction to the major concepts and theories of rhetoric from the ancient world to the present day. We will explore the roots of rhetoric in Athenian political culture, trace its development through Roman law and medieval religion and literature, and consider some of its modern and postmodern varieties. Along the way, we will see the centrality of the study and practice of persuasive speech and writing, and its relationship to politics, science, history, literature, and more. We will consider the art and effect of persuasion not only in literary texts, but also in political speeches, digital media, advertising, and everyday life. Our goal will be to unearth and understand the hidden arguments and assumptions that permeate our daily experiences.

Required Reading: Readings will be a combination of coursepack material, internet sources, and texts available from the UTM bookstore.

First Three Texts/Authors to be StudiedDissoi Logoi, Plato, Aristotle

Method of Instruction: Presuming that we will be returning to classrooms in January, this course will be held in one of UTM’s Active Learning Classrooms [ALC]. The ALC is designed as a highly interactive learning environment based on group work, problem-solving, and task accomplishment; the course’s mixture of (some) lectures and (much) in-class participation will reflect and take advantage of this design.

Method of Evaluation: Weekly short exercises based on traditional rhetorical exercises; midterm test; group participation, final paper.


Course Title: Introduction to the Novel

Course Code: ENG211H5S | Lecture M 10-12, W 10-11

Instructor: Mitch Johnston

This course gives students a foundational understanding of the novel in English. It introduces them to the history of the novel, from medieval sagas and adventure stories to modern experiments with fragmentary narratives. The course covers novels from a range of geographical places; students will be asked to consider why the novel has been so successful in the past, and what its futures might be. Students will read at least one complete novel during the course and extracts from others. [36L]

Exclusion: ENG210Y

Prerequisites: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits. Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Group n/a


Course Title: The Canadian Short Story

Course Code: ENG215H5F | Lecture MWF 9-10

InstructorDaniela Janes

An introduction to the Canadian short story, this course emphasizes its rich variety of settings, subjects and styles.

Prerequisite: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits.

Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Group 5 Canadian Literature


Course Title: Introduction to Shakespeare

Course Code: ENG223H5S | Lecture MW 1-2 | Tutorials M 2-3, M 4-5

InstructorLiza Blake

This course introduces students to Shakespeare. Lectures equip them with historical knowledge about literature, politics, and the theatre in Shakespeare's time. Tutorials help them to grapple with Shakespeare's language, versification and stagecraft. By the end of the course students will have a new framework within which to understand — and interrogate — the enduring power of Shakespeare's work.

Exclusion: ENG220Y5, DRE221Y5, DRE224H5

Prerequisite: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits.

Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Group 3 Literature pre-1700

Detailed Description by Instructor
In this course, we will read 5-6 plays by William Shakespeare, across the major dramatic genres and subgenres of revenge tragedy, comedy, history, tragedy, and romance, examining issues of textual and theatrical inheritance, race, gender, perceptions of the body, power relations, and negotiations across different economic classes. Lecture will frame plays historically, culturally, and theatrically, while also paying attention to the way Shakespeare has been remediated in textual editing, performance, and modern culture more widely.

Selected Major Readings: 5-6 plays, likely selected from: Titus Andronicus; Comedy of Errors, Much Ado About Nothing; Coriolanus; Othello; Richard III; 1 and 2 Henry 4; As You Like It; Troilus and Cressida; The Tempest

If you plan to read a lot of Shakespeare, I recommend purchasing the Norton Shakespeare (ISBN 978-0393934991), which will give you all 36 of Shakespeare’s plays and his poetry in one package. No matter what, the editions you use must have clearly marked acts, scenes, and line numbers as well as notes at the bottom of the page or in the margins (or on the facing page in the case of the Folger editions of Shakespeare). Older editions of the Norton Shakespeare (ISBNs 978-0393929911 or 978-0393970869 – you are much more likely to find these used and cheap than the brand new one), Arden (for individual plays only), New Cambridge, or New Folger are all consistently reliable for Shakespeare texts; for any other publisher you should check with me before purchasing texts. If you plan to buy individual playtexts please wait to do so until I have finalized the lineup of plays and posted the syllabus on Quercus in the middle of the summer.

First Three Texts/Authors to be Studied: Titus Andronicus; assorted sonnets

Method of Instruction: Both lectures and tutorials. Interactive class meetings (lectures) will be run synchronously, with recorded versions available for a week after. Tutorials are default synchronous, and I strongly encourage you attend them and participate in synchronous discussions! I guarantee you that you will get the most out of the class if you attend tutorials, which should be your highest priority. We will also set up discussion boards or another means for asynchronous participation.

Method of Evaluation: creative and analytical writing assignments; take-home quizzes; participation in discussion-oriented tutorials


Course Title: Children's Literature

Course Code: ENG234H5F | Lecture MWF 1-2

InstructorDaniela Janes

A critical and historical study of poetry and fiction written for or appropriated by children, this course may also include drama or non-fiction. The authors studied may include Bunyan, Stevenson, Carroll, Twain, Alcott, Nesbit, Montgomery, Milne, Norton, Fitzhugh and Rowling.

Prerequisite: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits.

Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Group n/a


Course Title: Comics and the Graphic Novel

Course Code: ENG235H5F | Lecture MWF 12-1

Instructor: Chester Scoville

An introduction to the writing and sequential art of comics and graphic novels, this course includes fictional and nonfictional comics by artists such as Will Eisner, Art Spiegelman, Frank Miller, Alan Moore, Chris Ware, Daniel Clowes, Julie Doucet, Marjane Satrapi, Chester Brown and Seth.

Prerequisite: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits.

Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Group n/a

Detailed Description by Instructor:
The graphic novel, comic books, sequential art — whatever its name, this popular but long-marginalized art form has been rapidly gaining cultural respectability. Over the past twenty years, artists and writers in this medium have departed from its traditional subject matter to create graphic autobiographies, journalism, political analyses, philosophical arguments and histories, as well as revisiting, critiquing and reinventing such familiar subjects as magic, science fiction and the superhero. This course will examine the range of the current graphic novel, focusing on the medium’s rhetoric, narration and socio-political range.

Selected Major Readings:
We will be reading such literary graphic texts as Seth’s It’s a Good Life, If You Don’t Weaken; Meags Fitzgerald's Photobooth, and Emil Ferris’s My Favorite Thing is Monsters, as well as some mainstream comics such as Grant Morrison’s Animal Man. We will also use such resources as Scott McCloud’s Understanding Comics as theoretical and historical background.

First Three Texts/Authors to be Studied: McCloud, Seth, Fitzgerald

Method of Instruction: Online, asynchronous lecture/synchronous discussion, unless we will have returned to classrooms by then.

Method of Evaluation: There will be several short writing assignments, leading up to a substantial final essay.


Course Title: Science Fiction

Course Code: ENG237H5S | Lecture T11-1, R 10-11

InstructorStanka Radovic

This course explores speculative fiction that invents or extrapolates an inner or outer cosmology from the physical, life, social, and human sciences. Typical subjects include AI, alternative histories, cyberpunk, evolution, future and dying worlds, genetics, space/time travel, strange species, theories of everything, utopias, and dystopias. [36L]

Prerequisites: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits. Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Group n/a


Course Title: Fantasy Literature

Course Code: ENG238H5F | Lecture MWF 10-11

InstructorChester Scoville

This course focuses on fantasy literature, film and television, and draws on a wide range of critical, cultural and theoretical approaches. As it explores the magical and supernatural, it may consider such genres as alternative histories, animal fantasy, epic, fairy tales, magic realism and swords and sorcery. Authors and texts covered will survey the history of fantasy across American, British and Canadian literature, and may include Beowulf, Butler, Carroll, Gaiman, Le Guin, Lewis, Martin, Ovid, Rowling, Shakespeare, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Swift and Tolkien.

Prerequisite: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits.

Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Group n/a

Detailed Description by Instructor:
Fantasy literature is, as Brian Attebery puts it, the literature of making the oldest stories say new things. Or, to look at it from Seo-Young Chu’s perspective, it is the art of making literary techniques themselves into the story. These two critical perspectives will begin our reading of fantasy fiction, which will range from early modern fairy and folk tales through some classics of 19th and 20th-century literary fantasy, to contemporary tales of the fantastic in modern settings. Along the way, we will focus on how fantasy transforms the concrete realities of place, space, and everyday life into something unfamiliar, and how readers experience and interact with its complex rhetorical modes. We will also consider fantasy as a popular and cultural phenomenon, asking why it has become so important to so many people in our modern, technological, apparently disenchanted age.

Required Reading 
We will read a number of fantasies old and new, including fairy tales of Hans Christian Andersen, Tolkien’s The Hobbit, LeGuin’s The Tombs of Atuan, and Clarke’s Piranesi, as well as locally-situated texts such as Bobet’s Above and Hopkinson’s Brown Girl in the Ring.

First Three Text/Authors to be Studied: Andersen, Tolkien, LeGuin

Method of Instruction: Online, asynchronous lecture/synchronous discussion, unless we will have returned to classrooms by then.

Method of Evaluation: There will be several short writing assignments, leading up to a substantial final essay.


Course Title: Horror Literature

Course Code: ENG239H5F | Lecture T 12-2, R 1-2

InstructorChris Koenig-Woodyard

A critical and historical critical introduction to gothic literature, film, and television covering such authors as Carter, King, Lovecraft, Matheson, Poe, Rice, Shelley, Stevenson, and Stoker. The course draws on diverse critical and theoretical approaches as it examines a wide range of national and cultural contexts. It focuses on the gothic in broad terms and such concepts and issues as fear, horror, terror, the monstrous, the mythological, and the supernatural. [36L]

Prerequisites: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits. Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Group n/a


Course Title: Introduction to American Literature

Course Code: ENG251H5F | Lecture T 9-11, R 10-11

Instructor: Patti Luedecke

This course introduces students to major works in American literature in a variety of genres, from poetry and fiction to essays and slave narratives.

Exclusion: ENG250Y5

Prerequisite: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits.

Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Group 6 American Literature


Course Title: Introduction to Canadian Literature

Course Code: ENG255H5F | Lecture T 1-3, R 2-3

InstructorColin Hill

This course introduces students to Canadian literatures, from the oral narratives of Canada's early Indigenous communities to new writing in a digital age.

Exclusion: ENG252Y5

Prerequisite: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits.

Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100 level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Group 5 Canadian Literature

Detailed Description by Instructor:
This course is an introduction to some of Canada’s best writing from pre-confederation to the present. Our writers are from diverse backgrounds and engage the cultural conditions of their evolving country from various perspectives. Class topics will include (but are not limited to) exploration and immigration narratives, Canadian literary history and development, realism, modernism, urban / rural tensions, the artist figure, gender and sexuality, Canadian postmodernism and postcolonialism, multiculturalism, racism and anti-racism, psychological and spiritual self-discovery, and personal, social, cultural, and national identities.

Selected Major Readings: This course consists of short readings from An Anthology of Canadian Literature in English, ed. Bennett and Brown, 4th edition.

First Three Texts/Authors to be Studied: TBA

Method of Instruction: Lecture and discussion

Method of Evaluation
1. Participation 10%
2. Term Paper 35%
3. Mid-term Test 25%
4. Final exam 30%


Course Title: Music and Literature

Course Code: ENG261H5S | Lecture M 1-2, W 1-3

Instructor: Brent Wood

This course introduces students to the intersection of music and literature. We will study how melody, rhythm and texture interact with language, story and performance using examples from folk ballads and blues, art-songs, popular songs, musical theatre, jazz and hiphop, as well as poems inspired by musical styles and performers. Works to be covered may include folksongs collected by Francis Child and Alan Lomax, Thomas Moore’s Irish Melodies, popular songs by Bob Dylan, Leonard Cohen and Joni Mitchell, theatrical works by Bertolt Brecht, Stephen Sondheim and Lin-Manuel Miranda, performances by The Last Poets, hiphop lyrics by Public Enemy, and poems by William Blake, William Wordsworth, Emily Dickinson, Langston Hughes and Don McKay.

Prerequisite: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits.

Group n/a


Course Title: Queer Writing

Course Code: ENG269H5F | Lecture 

InstructorThomas Laughlin

Introducing a lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, and queer tradition in literature and theory, this course may explore texts from a variety of historical periods, from the classical to the contemporary. It will focus on a variety of genres, potentially including poetry, drama, fiction, criticism, and popular culture. [36L]

Exclusion: ENG273Y1

Prerequisites: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits. Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Group 1 Literary Theory/Methods


Course Title: Literatures of Immigration and Exile

Course Code: ENG273H5S | Lecture M 3-5, W 3-4

InstructorRaji Soni

In this course we will study literary and non-literary texts in English from the 19th century to the present day that come from colonial and postcolonial contexts and that speak to the experience of those affected by colonization, immigration, exile, war and globalization. Students will be introduced to postcolonial theory and questions about race, ethnicity, religious difference and diasporas in Anglophone literary studies. They may study texts by Conrad, James, Beckett, Joyce, Rhys, Pound, Ionesco, Nabokov, Koestler, Brodsky, Naipaul, Achebe, Kundera, Skvorecky, Rushdie, Gallant, Sebald, Ondaatje, Danticat, Ali and Nafisi.

Exclusion: ENG253Y5, ENG270Y1, ENG270Y5, ENG272H5

Prerequisite: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits.

Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Group 2 Race, Ethnicity, Diaspora, Indigeneity


Course Title: Indigenous Literatures

Course Code: ENG274H5F | Lecture MWF 11-12

Instructor: Daniela Janes

An introduction to Indigenous literature with emphasis on writers from Canada's First Nations. Readings will be considered in the context of global aboriginal cultures and oral traditions. Texts may include fiction, poetry, drama and non-fiction by writers such as Sherman Alexie, Jeannette Armstrong, Michael Dorris, Tomson Highway, Basil Johnston, Thomas King, Lee Maracle, Daniel David Moses, Eden Robinson  andLeslie Marmon Silko.

Prerequisite: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits.

Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in ENG101H or ENG102H5 or ENG110H5 or ENG140Y5 or DRE/ENG121H5 and DRE/ENG122H5 may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Group 2 Race, Ethnicity, Diaspora, Indigeneity


Course Title: Feminist Approaches to Literature

Course Code: ENG275H5F | Lecture T 11-12, R 11-1

InstructorAnna Thomas

This course will consider the implications, for literary studies and for literary writing, of modern traditions of feminist and gender theory. Students will encounter the work of major feminist thinkers — e.g., Mary Wollstonecraft, Simone de Beauvoir, Alice Walker, Julie Kristeva, and Judith Butler — and texts by major women writers. The course will explore feminist approaches to literature, including those that borrow from post-structural, psychoanalytic, and contemporary gender, race and queer theories.

Prerequisite: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits.

Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in ENG101H or ENG102H5 or ENG110H5 or ENG140Y5 or DRE/ENG121H5 and DRE/ENG122H5 may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Group 1 Literary Theory/Methods

Detailed Description by Instructor:
This course will begin with the question of what constitutes a "feminist approach" by examining how positionality and perspective have been pursued in many feminist theories. The scale, methodology, and constituency of the "approach" can range from the individual to the institutional; the communal to the political; the local to the transnational; from solidarity to critique. Together the class will build a vocabulary for analyzing the emphases and omissions of the feminist literary tradition, ending with a particular emphasis on Black Feminism.

Selected Major Readings: Selections from A Room of One’s Own, Gertrude Stein, Simone de Beauvoir, bell hooks, June Jordan.

First Three Texts /Authors to be Studied: Saidiya Hartman, Mary Wollstonecraft, Phillis Wheatley

Method of Instruction: Lecture and discussion

Method of Evaluation: Thesis statement assignments, one essay, exam


Course Title: Video Games

Course Code: ENG279H5S | Lecture F 9-11 | PRA: W 9-10, W 10-11

Instructor: Siobhan O'Flynn

What is the literary history of video games? This course considers how some novels and plays work like games; how games have evolved complex and often non-verbal means of conveying narratives; and whether narrative in fiction, theatre and film can or should be a model for storytelling in the rule-bound, interactive worlds of video games.

Prerequisite: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits.

Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in ENG101H or ENG102H5 or ENG110H5 or ENG140Y5 or DRE/ENG121H5 and DRE/ENG122H5 may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Group n/a


Course Title: Critical Approaches to Literature

Course Code: ENG280H5F | Lecture F 11-1 | Tutorials F 1-2, F 3-4

InstructorThomas Laughlin

An introduction to literary theory and its central questions, such as the notion of literature itself, the relation between literature and reality, the nature of literary language, the making of literary canons and the roles of the author and the reader.

Exclusion: ENG267H5

Prerequisite: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits.

Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Group n/a


Course Title: Creative Writing

Course Code: ENG289H5S | Lecture MW 12-1 | Tutorials W 1-2, M 3-4

InstructorGeoff Bouvier

Students will engage in a variety of creative exercises, conducted across a range of different genres of literary writing.

Prerequisite: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits.

Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in ENG101H or ENG102H5 or ENG110H5 or ENG140Y5 or DRE/ENG121H5 and DRE/ENG122H5 may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Group n/a


Course Title: Reading for Creative Writing

Course Code: ENG291H5F | Lecture TR 1-2 | Tutorials T 2-3,T 4-5

Instructor: Brent Wood

This course will help students to see connections between their reading and their work as creative writers. They will read texts in a variety of literary and non-literary genres and consider the way that writers learn their craft from other writers. Practical assignments will encourage students to find creative ways to critique, imitate, speak to and borrow responsibly from the work they read.

Prerequisite: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits.

Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in ENG101H or ENG102H5 or ENG110H5 or ENG140Y5 or DRE/ENG121H5 and DRE/ENG122H5 may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Group n/a


Third-Year Courses

Fall Term

Winter Term

Year-Long


Course Title: Chaucer

Course Code: ENG300Y5 | Lecture MWF 2-3

InstructorChester Scoville

The foundation of English literature: in their uncensored richness and range, Chaucer's works have delighted wide audiences for over 600 years. Includes The Canterbury Tales, with its variety of narrative genres from the humorous and bawdy to the religious and philosophical, and Troilus and Criseyde, a profound erotic masterpiece.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits

Group 3 Literature pre-1700

Detailed Description by Instructor:
The poems of Geoffrey Chaucer are among the greatest works of world literature. We will consider them in the material contexts of life in of 14th-century England, and as both a reflection and a critique of the major intellectual, political, and cultural issues of his time. We will also consider his pioneering use of the English language, his use of philosophical ideas and of popular story genres, and his consideration of matters such as class and gender in the creation of a uniquely vibrant fictional world.

The readings in this course will all be in Chaucer’s original, 14th-century Middle English; thus we will be learning how to read Chaucer’s language, starting with his short poems and working up to his longer narratives, culminating with The Canterbury Tales. Prior experience reading Middle English is not required.

Selected Major Readings: All of our readings will be taken from The Norton Chaucer, edited by David Lawton.

First Three Texts/Authors to be Studied: Chaucer’s short poems, The Book of the Duchess, The House of Fame.

Method of Instruction: The course will run as a combination of lecture and discussion, with much emphasis on in-class reading and interpretation. Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, this course will, as of now, at least begin in the first term in remote delivery.

Method of Evaluation:4 short tests focusing on Middle English reading and interpretation, 10% each. 2 term essays, 30% each.


Course Title: Seventeenth-Century Poetry

Course Code: ENG304H5S | Lecture M 3-5, W 3-4

Instructor: Liza Blake

Considering literature during the reign of the early Stuarts and the Civil War, this course includes such poets as Donne, Jonson, Lanyer, Wroth, Herbert, and Marvell, and such prose writers as Bacon, Clifford, Donne, Wroth, Burton, Cary, Browne, Hobbes, Milton, and Cavendish. 

Exclusion: ENG304Y5

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Group 3 Literature pre-1700

Detailed Description by Instructor
With the death of Queen Elizabeth in 1603 came an end to the “Golden Age” of Elizabethan literature, and the inauguration of a rich and complicated era of intellectual, poetic, and political history. Old and new ways of thinking and being came crashing together in the seventeenth century, as interactions with the Americas became more frequent (and more fraught); advances in science and cosmology forced people to rethink the natural world and their place in it; politics and theology fought and collaborated in new and unexpected ways; and the monarchy was abolished (with the execution of King Charles I), and then reinstated. We will read deeply in frank, often erotic love poetry quite different from the Elizabethan poetry that preceded yet created it; in social and political satire; in metaphysical poetry that combines philosophy and verse; and in political philosophy and poetry.

Selected Major Readings: Authors to be covered include Donne, Herbert, Phillips, Crashaw, Vaughan, Traherne, Jonson, Lanyer, Bacon, Cavendish, Herrick, Marvell, Hutchinson, and Pulter.

Most readings will come from Seventeenth-Century British Poetry, 1603-1660, ed. John P. Rumrich and Gregory Chaplin (Norton) [ISBN 9780393979985]

First Three Texts/Authors to be Studied: Donne, “The Bait,” “The Flea,” “Air and Angels”

Method of Instruction: Interactive class meetings will be run synchronously, with recorded versions available for a week after. I strongly encourage you attend and participate in synchronous discussions! I guarantee you that you will get the most out of the class if you attend live. We will also set up discussion boards or another means for asynchronous participation.

Method of Evaluation: creative and analytical writing assignments; take-home quizzes; active and engaged discussion


Course Title: Women Writers before Austen

Course Code: ENG307H5S | Lecture T 3-4, R 3-5

Instructor: Marshelle Woodward

A study of mystical writings, poems, plays, novels, letters, periodical essays, polemical works and books for children by such writers as Julian of Norwich, Margery Kempe, Mary Sidney, Emilia Lanyer, Margaret Cavendish, Aphra Behn, Fanny Burney and Mary Wollstonecraft. Topics may include patronage and publishing; nationality, class, and gender; and generic conventions.

Prerequisite: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits

Group 3 Literature pre-1700


Course Title: Special Topic in Nineteenth-Century British Literature (The Brontes & Their Afterlives)

Course Code: ENG315H5F | Lecture M 2-3, W 2-4

Instructor: TBA

A concentrated study of one aspect of nineteenth-century British literature or literary culture, such as a particular subgenre or author, specific theme, or the application of a particular critical approach. [36L]

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3 additional credits.

Group 3 Literature pre-1700


Course Title: Austen and Her Contemporaries

Course Code: ENG323H5F | Lecture T 10-11, R 10-12

InstructorChris Koenig-Woodyard

A study of selected novels by Austen and of works by such contemporaries as Radcliffe, Godwin, Wollstonecraft, Wordsworth, Edgeworth, Scott and Shelley, in the context of the complex literary, social and political relationships of that time.

Prerequisite: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits

Group 4 Literature 1700-1900


Course Title: The Victorian Novel

Course Code: ENG325H5S | Lecture F 12-3

InstructorThomas Laughlin

This course surveys several major novels in order to understand the genre that came to dominate literary culture in the Victorian era. Topics may include realism, the marriage plot, the social-problem novel, feminism and sexual identity, novels of growing up, the city and seriality. Authors may include Dickens, Thackeray, E. Bronte, C. Bronte, Gaskell, Trollope, Eliot, Collins, Hardy, Gissing and Wilde, among others.

Prerequisite: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits

Group 4 Literature 1700-1900


Course Title: Medieval Drama

Course Code: ENG330H5S | Lecture MWF 10-11

InstructorChester Scoville

Texts and performances preceding and underlying the plays of Shakespeare and his contemporaries, including creation-to-doomsday play cycles; plays performed in parishes, inns, great halls, outdoor arenas and at court; religious and political propaganda plays; political pageants. Attention is given to social, political and theatrical contexts.

Prerequisite: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits

Group 3 Literature pre-1700

Detailed Description by Instructor
The drama of the late English Middle Ages is among the most sophisticated and vibrant bodies of popular art to survive from that period. Drawing from popular religious traditions and embedded in localized conditions of production, medieval drama gives us a rare glimpse of the full range of lived experiences of its time and place, as created and interpreted by learned scholars of the time, by highly skilled performers, and by working people. Medieval plays took over city streets and rural fields, great houses and school halls, transforming them into mythic and abstract landscapes, portraying events from the world’s creation to its destruction. The study of medieval drama study today is equally robust and surprising, as modern scholars, actors, and audiences interpret and reinterpret the remaining traces of what was once a rich and widespread artistic field. This course will give students an introduction to some of medieval drama’s major surviving texts, and to the scholarly and dramaturgical issues that surround them.

Selected Major Readings: Our primary readings will all rely on The Broadview Anthology of Medieval Drama, edited by Fitzgerald and Sebastian.

First Three Texts/Authors to be Studied: Hrosvitha, Abraham; York plays; The Conversion of Saint Paul.

Method of Instruction: Mixed lecture/discussion with frequent group discussion and exercises.

Method of Evaluation: Scaffolded writing assignments leading to a substantial final project.


Course Title: Jacobean Drama

Course Code: ENG335H5F | Lecture W 11-12, F 11-1

Instructor: Marshelle Woodward

This course explores English drama from the death of Queen Elizabeth I to the closing of the theatres, with attention to such playwrights as Jonson, Middleton, Shakespeare, and Webster. As part of this course, students may have the option of participating in an international learning experience that will have an additional cost and application process.

Exclusion: ENG332Y5

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Group 3 Literature pre-1700


Course Title: Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Drama

Course Code: ENG337H5F | Lecture W 10-11, F 10-12

Instructor: Nevena Martinovic

At least twelve plays, including works by Dryden, Wycherley, Congreve, Behn, and their successors, chosen to demonstrate the modes of drama practised during the period, the relationship between these modes, and the connection between the plays and the theatres for which they were designed. [36L]

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Group 4 Literature 1700-1900


Course Title: World Drama

Course Code: ENG343H5S | Lecture W 11-12, F 11-1

Instructor: Natasha Vashisht

Students will read/watch screenings of drama in English and in translation from around the world, including Africa, East Asia, South Asia, the Middle East, the Caribbean, Latin America, and South America. Topics may include traditional forms (Kathakali dance, Noh and Kabuki, Beijing Opera, Nigerian masquerades) adapted for the modern stage; agit-prop and political drama; object performance; the place of drama within a global media ecology; and drama as a site of intercultural and transcultural appropriation, negotiation, and exchange.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Group 2 Race, Ethnicity, Diaspora, Indigeneity


Course Title: Spy Fiction

Course Code: ENG344H5F | Lecture W 6-9

Instructor: Richard Greene

This course examines the rise and popularization of spy fiction in the twentieth century. It focuses on authors such as Graham Greene and John le Carré within the context of the Cold War and the nuclear stand-off between the Soviet Union and the West.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Group n/a

Detailed Description by Instructor:
This course will look at the sophisticated and popular genre of spy fiction as it was practiced in the past seventy years by Graham Greene, John le Carré (pseudonym of David Cornwell), and Viet Thanh Nguyen. All of the stories we will be studying are deeply connected to the history of the Cold War, during which the world hung precariously on the verge of nuclear annihilation, a time when information about the enemy’s technical capabilities or order of battle could make the difference between life and death for millions. Both East and West devoted an enormous effort to obtaining that information. Intelligence agents sought to encourage well-placed persons on the other side to betray their country and were often enough guilty of their own betrayals. The course will spend a great deal of time considering the ideological confrontation between capitalism and communism, the aftermath of colonialism, the ethics of disguise and deep cover, and the suppression or fracturing of personal identity.

Selected Major Readings:
Graham Greene, The Quiet American (1955).
Graham Greene, Our Man in Havana (1958).
Graham Greene, The Human Factor (1978).
John le Carré, The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (1963).
John le Carré, Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy (1974).
Viet Thanh Nguyen, The Sympathizer (2015).

First Three Texts/Authors to be Studied:
Graham Greene, The Quiet American (1955).
Graham Greene, Our Man in Havana (1958).
Graham Greene, The Human Factor (1978).

Method of Instruction: In-person lecture and discussion.

Method of Evaluation: Three short essays worth 25% each and six reading quizzes worth a total of 25%


Course Title: Poetry and Modernism

Course Code: ENG350H5F | Lecture M 1-3, W 2-3

InstructorGeoff Bouvier

Special study of Hopkins, Yeats, Pound, Eliot, Stevens; selections from other poets.

Exclusion: ENG348Y5

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Group n/a

Detailed Description by Instructor:
What do we mean when we refer to modernism? And, for that matter, what do we mean when we refer to poetry? In this course, students will read, study, and even imitate a diverse range of late 19th and early 20th century poetry in the context of the cultural, technological, and aesthetic zeitgeist that is now known as “modernism.”

Selected Major ReadingsBlast1 Manifesto; various essays on Modernism and poetry; selected poems of and essays about Charles Baudelaire, Stephane Mallarme, Mina Loy, Gertrude Stein, T.S. Eliot, Chika Sagawa, Jean Toomer, William Carlos Williams, and Langston Hughes.

First Three Texts/Authors to be StudiedBlast1Manifesto; various essays on Modernism and poetry

Method of Instruction: Online synchronous

Method of Evaluation: Participation (10%); Daily Class Activities (10%); Discussion Board (35%); Group Presentation (10%); Final Project (35%)


Course Title: Canadian Drama

Course Code: ENG352H5S | Lecture MWF 9-10

Instructor: Daniela Janes

Canadian plays, with emphasis on major playwrights and on developments since 1940, but with attention also to the history of the theatre in Canada.

Exclusion: ENG223H5

Prerequisite: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Group 5 Canadian Literature


Course Title: New Writing in Canada

Course Code: ENG357H5S | Lecture T 11-12, R 11-1

InstructorColin Hill

Close encounters with recent writing in Canada: new voices, new forms, and new responses to old forms. Texts may include or focus on poetry, fiction, drama, non-fiction, or new media.

Prerequisite: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Group 5 Canadian Literature

Detailed Description by Instructor
This course explores writing published in Canada in the twenty-first century with an emphasis upon the diversity of voices and perspectives in contemporary Canadian literatures. We will read shorter works of fiction and poetry alongside novels and plays by contemporary Canadian authors who write in Canadian and international contexts. As we work to discern the “new directions” of Canada’s literatures in the twenty-first century, our topics will include (but are not limited to) the role of the writer in the contemporary world, language, gender and sexuality, Canadian postmodernism and post-colonialism, multiculturalism, racism and anti-racism, Indigenous reconciliation, psychological and spiritual self-discovery, historiography, the Canadian Literature/Literatures in Canada debate, and individual, social, cultural, regional, and national identities.

Selected Major Readings: Selections from Changing the Face of Canadian Literature (ed. Dane Swan), and two or three longer works of fiction and/or drama to be announced.

First Three Texts/Authors to be Studied: Short works from the anthology TBA

Method of Instruction: Discussion and lecture

Method of Evaluation:
Participation 15%
Term paper 35%
Midterm test 25%
Final exam 25%


Course Title: Contemporary American Fiction

Course Code: ENG365H5S | Lecture MWF 2-3 

Instructor: Ira Halpern

This course explores six or more works by at least four contemporary American writers of fiction.

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Group 6 American Literature


Course Title: Special Topic in American Literature (African American Literature)

Course Code: ENG367H5S | Lecture T 2-3, R 1-3

Instructor: Anna Thomas

A concentrated study of one aspect of American literature or literary culture, such as a particular subgenre, author, period or theme, or the application of a particular critical approach.

Prerequisite: 2.0 credit in ENG, including ENG250Y5, and 4.0 additional credits

Group 6 American Literature

Detailed Description by Instructor:
This class is an advanced introduction to the field of African American literary studies, tracing its origins and emergence through the slave trade to the present day, with particular focus on 19th- and 20th-century writing, and the criticism and theory to which it gives rise. Authors studied may include: Harriet Jacobs, Charles Chesnutt, Pauline Hopkins, James Baldwin, Gayl Jones, Toni Morrison.

Selected Major Readings: Harriet Jacobs, Charles Chesnutt, Pauline Hopkins, James Baldwin, Gayl Jones, Toni Morrison.

First Three Texts/Authors to be Studied: Harriet Jacobs, Frederick Douglass, Ida B. Wells

Method of Instruction: lecture and discussion

Method of Evaluation: short essays


Course Title: Global Literatures in English

Course Code: ENG370H5F | Lecture M 11-1, W 11-12

Instructor: Stanka Radovic

This course involves in-depth study, within the framework of postcolonial and transnational studies, of literatures in English from around the world. It includes fictional and non-fictional texts and contemporary films and media representations.

Prerequisite: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits

Group 2 Race, Ethnicity, Diaspora, Indigeneity


Course Title: Special Topic in World Literature (Living a Feminist Life)

Course Code: ENG371H5S | Lecture T 3-6

Instructor: Anjuli Raza Kolb

A concentrated study of one aspect of postcolonial literature or literary culture, such as a particular genre, author, period, regional or national context, or theme, or the application of a particular critical approach.

Prerequisite: 1.0 credits in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Group 2 Race, Ethnicity, Diaspora, Indigeneity

Detailed Description by Instructor:
This class will examine how “knowledge” about women’s, femmes’ and non-binary lives have been constructed in text, and how this knowledge determines and impacts the choices we have and make. In the first six weeks we’ll do a deep reading of Sara Ahmed’s recent theoretical book, Living a Feminist Life, putting her ideas in conversation with thinkers like Jamaica Kincaid, Audre Lorde, Gayatri Spivak, Valerie Solanas, Angela Davis, Jose Muñoz, and bell hooks. In the second half of the course, we’ll work together through discussion and student suggestions to construct a corpus of super-contemporary women’s and femmes’ life writing—TV, poetry, music, journalism, memes, theory, and memoir—to discover how image and the written word continue to shape feminist lives, and how femmes’ lived experience in turn shapes feminist, pro-femme, and queer discourse. Through weekly short writing exercises, students will consider how their own intimate relationships—with parents, partners, children, neighbors, or friends—can become sites of intersectional feminist activism, and sources of strength and knowledge to be carried into the broader world of public engagement and intervention. In the final weeks of the course, we will think seriously about the relationship between learning and living, and collectively interrogate the boundary between writing and living as modes of feminist praxis.

Selected Major Readings:
Sara Ahmed, Living a Feminist Life
Jamaica Kincaid, A Small Place
Audre Lorde, Sister Outsider
Megan Fernandes, Good Boys

First Three Texts/Authors to be Studied:
Patricia Lockwood “Rape Joke”
Sara Ahmed, Living A Feminist Life
Flavia Dzodan, “My Feminism Will Be Intersectional or it Will Be Bullshit”

Method of Instruction: Class discussion, small group discussion, regular informal writing, mapping reading, interactive lecture, creative work

Method of Evaluation: Nine very short writing and reading comprehension assignments, one mini-presentation, one final project to be designed by each student (critical or creative)


Course Title: Special Topic in Literary Theory (AI and Critical Theory)

Course Code: ENG372H5S | Lecture T 1-2, R 1-3

Instructor: Avery Slater

A concentrated study of one aspect of literary or critical theory, such as a particular school of theory, an important author, or a contemporary theoretical debate.

Prerequisite: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Group 1 Literary Theory/Methods


Course Title: Creative Writing: Poetry

Course Code: ENG373H5S LEC0101 | Lecture F 3-5

Instructor: Liz Howard

This course will involve a wide variety of experiments with poetic expression and poetic forms.

Prerequisite: ENG289H5/ENG291H5

Group n/a


Course Title: Creative Writing: Poetry

Course Code: ENG373H5S LEC0102 | Lecture F 3-5

Instructor: Jacob Scheier

This course will involve a wide variety of experiments with poetic expression and poetic forms.

Prerequisite: ENG289H5/ENG291H5

Group n/a


Course Title: Creative Writing: Prose

Course Code: ENG374H5F LEC9101 | Lecture W 3-5

Instructor: Brent Wood

Students will experiment with fiction and non-fiction prose writing, including autobiography, biography and narrative for new visual, digital and interactive media.

Prerequisite: ENG289H5/ENG291H5

Group n/a


Course Title: Creative Writing: Prose

Course Code: ENG374H5F LEC9102 | Lecture W 3-5

Instructor: Holly Luhning

Students will experiment with fiction and non-fiction prose writing, including autobiography, biography and narrative for new visual, digital and interactive media.

Prerequisite: ENG289H5/ENG291H5

Group n/a

Course Title: British Romanticism, 1770-1800

Course Code: ENG385H5F | Lecture W 6-9

InstructorDan White

This course covers the early Romantic period in British Literature. Students may read novels such as Frances Burney's Evelina; plays such as Richard Brinsley Sheridan's School for Scandal; writing on the French and American Revolutions; William Blake's Songs of Innocence and of Experience; and ballads by William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Hannah More and Mary Robinson.

Exclusion: ENG308Y5

Prerequisite: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Group 4 Literature 1700-1900

Detailed Description by Instructor
This course provides a general survey of the poetry and prose of the early part of the Romantic period. You will thus become familiar with the astonishing literary output of William Cowper, Anna Barbauld, Ottobah Cugoano, William Blake, William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and Mary Wollstonecraft, among others. Subjects to be explored will include new ideas about the imagination and creativity, the revolutions that gave birth to our modern political order, slavery and the transatlantic movement to abolish the slave trade, the expansion of the British Empire, the advent of feminist thought and the emergence of women writers as a major cultural force, and the radical experiments with literary form through which writers responded to and shaped the cultural, social, and political developments of their age.

Selected Major Readings: Poetry and prose by A.L. Barbauld, W. Blake, E. Burke, S.T. Coleridge, W. Cowper, O. Cugoano, F. Jeffrey, H. More, T. Paine, C. Smith, H.M. Williams, M. Wollstonecraft, and W. Wordsworth

First Three Texts/Authors to be Studied: Selections by John Locke, Edmund Burke, William Gilpin, to be followed by poems of sensibility (by Hannah More, Helen Maria Williams, William Cowper)

Method of Instruction: Lecture and discussion

Method of Evaluation: Scansion assignment (10%); two close-reading exercises (15% each); term test (25%); term paper (35%)


Course Title: British Romanticism, 1800-1830

Course Code: ENG386H5S | Lecture W 11-12, F 10-12

InstructorChris Koenig-Woodyard

This course covers the later Romantic period in British Literature. Authors studied may include Walter Scott, Mary Shelley, Percy Shelley, Jane Austen, Lord Byron, and John Keats. [36L]

Exclusion: ENG308Y5

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Group 4 Literature 1700-1900

Detailed Description by Instructor
In surveying “early” Romanticism, which is typically comprised of the first generation of British Romantic writers such as Blake, Burney, Coleridge, Hemans, More, Robinson, and Wordsworth, we will explore intersections of literature and culture. Thus we will explore these and other writers’ roles in shaping (and being shaped by) a number of central themes, and political and cultural movements and events, that include revolution and reform (political and literary); legal and natural rights (age, gender, racial, natural/legal): Empire and Imperialism; The Slave Trade and Abolition—among others. In doing so, we are interested in investigating humanity and identity—along age, gender, race, national, and cultural lines—as we reflect on the very theory and practice of studying of English literature, periodization, and canonization.

Selected Major Readings: I have NOT ordered books through the UTM bookstore. Our textbook is available for free online (and which you can save on your computer in PDF):

1. Lance Newman, Joel Pace, and Chris Koenig-Woodyard. Transatlantic Romanticism: An Anthology of British, American, and Canadian Literature 1767–1867. https://tspace.library.utoronto.ca/handle/1807/101741

2. Other material posted under “Modules” on Quercus.

First Three Texts/Authors to be Studied: TBA

Method of Instruction: Lecture and Discussion

Method of Evaluation: Essays and Written Assignments


Course Title: Canadian Fiction

Course Code: ENG392H5F | Lecture T 11-12, R 11-1

Instructor: Colin Hill

Students will read novels and/or short stories of importance for Canadian literary history: these may include, for example, L.M. Montgomery’s Anne of Green Gables, Hugh MacLennan’s Two Solitudes, Lawrence Hill’s Book of Negroes, and Alice Munro’s Hateship, Friendship, Courtship, Loveship, Marriage.

Exclusion: ENG353Y

Group 5 Canadian Literature

Detailed Description by Instructor
This course offers students an exploration of the development of the Canadian novel. We will discuss texts by a diverse assortment of writers who engage the cultural conditions of Canada from the early 20th century to the present. Topics will include, but are not limited to, modernism, realism, urban/rural tensions, the artist figure, gender and sexuality, Canadian postmodernism and postcolonialism, multiculturalism, racism and anti-racism, psychological and spiritual self-discovery, various “schools” of Canadian literary theory, and personal, social, cultural, and national identities. Students will be expected to attend regularly and to complete readings thoughtfully and on time. Students are also strongly encouraged to participate in class discussions in a respectful and intellectually rigorous atmosphere. This course aims to build knowledge and appreciation of Canadian writing and to introduce students to a wide range of theoretical, critical, and literary-historical approaches relevant to the study of Canadian and other literatures. Engaged students should expect to come away from the course with a good understanding of the subjects and forms of the Canadian novel and many of its important literary, historical, cultural and theoretical contexts.

Selected Major Readings:
1. Hugh MacLennan, Two Solitudes
2. Margaret Atwood, Surfacing
3. Michael Ondaatje, In the Skin of a Lion
4. Thomas King, Green Grass, Running Water
5. André Alexis, Fifteen Dogs
6. Madeleine Thien, Do Not Say We Have Nothing

First Three Texts/Authors to be Studied: MacLennan, Atwood, Ondaatje

Method of Instruction: Lecture and discussion

Method of Evaluation
1. Participation 10%
2. Term Paper 35%
3. Mid-term Test 25%
4. Final exam 30%


Course Title: Literary Theory Now

Course Code: ENG396H5F | Lecture T 11-1, R 12-1

InstructorAvery Slater

This course will explore some of the most recent, provocative, and significant developments in literary theory, including work in such areas as eco-criticism, literary activism, critical race studies, Indigenous studies, queer and trans studies, and cognitive literary studies. 

Prerequisites: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Group 1 Literary Theory/Methods


Fourth-Year Courses

Fall Term

  • ENG426H5F Seminar: Race, Ethnicity, Diasporas, Indigeneity (TBA)
  • ENG460H5F Seminar: Literature Pre-1700 (Early Modern Asexualities)
  • ENG463H5F Seminar: Literature 1700-1900 (Early Women Playwrights, Aphra Behn to Joanna Baillie)

Winter Term

  • ENG400H5S Capstone Seminar: Writing a Research Project
  • ENG416H5S Seminar: Literary Theory / Methods (Language and the Human)
  • ENG472H5S Seminar: Modern and Contemporary Literature (Magical Realism in Postcolonial Literature)

Course Title: Capstone Seminar: Writing a Research Project

Course Code: ENG400H5S | Lecture T 11-1

InstructorAnjuli Raza Kolb

This course offers specialists and advanced majors an opportunity to do sustained and intensive research on a topic developed in consultation with the instructor. Course instruction will consist of training in various research methodologies, advice and help in putting together reading and research lists, and guided workshops where students can practice drafting, editing, and peer editing as well as comparing notes and research materials.
English Specialists have priority for registration, followed by English Majors.

Prerequisites: Completion of 14.5 credits.

Group n/a

Detailed Description by Instructor
The Capstone Seminar, “Writing a Research Project,” will focus on the why and the how of advanced literary research—in other words the motive and the method. In the first half of the term, we will read one novel and select cutting-edge literary scholarship and critical theory that pushes methodological boundaries. By defining and outlining projects using approaches like historicism, Critical Race Theory, Marxist analysis, psychoanalysis, eco-criticism, personal essay, and creative praxis, students will enter the second half of the term with an array of critical tools for approaching their research projects and making informed choices about how to assemble their reading lists and outline and construct final papers. Students will have an opportunity to meet with two visiting researchers, who will present their own literary critical methods and answer questions about students’ projects. The last six weeks of the course will be tailored to individual research projects with regular personalized assignments, self-directed reading, peer-editing work, presentations of research, and consultations with the professor and research librarians. A full draft of the capstone project will be due before the end of term, and the final weeks will be dedicated to radical revision, filling research gaps, and self-editing. Students in this course can expect to take away a polished literary critical essay for publication or graduate school writing samples, and viable plans for further scholarly and/or literary and cultural studies.

Selected Major Readings:
Ling Ma, Severance
Terrance Hayes, To Float in the Space Between
Toni Morrison, Playing in the Dark
Raj Patel and Jason W. Moore, A History of the World in Seven Cheap Things
Katherine McKittrick, Dear Science
Jane Hu & Anjuli Raza Kolb, ed. Severance cluster Post 45
Sarah Brouillette, Literature and the Creative Economy

First Three Texts/Authors to be Studied:
Ling Ma, Severance
Raj Patel and Jason W. Moore, A History of the World in Seven Cheap Things (introduction)
Katherine McKittrick, Dear Science (introduction)

Method of Instruction: Class discussion, lecture, visiting scholars, small group work, regular writing, research visits to library

Method of Evaluation: 3 short writing assignments (in service of drafting), one annotated bibliography, a presentation, and a final project.


Course Title: Seminar: Literary Theory / Methods (Language and the Human)

Course Code: ENG416H5S | Seminar T 3-5

InstructorAvery Slater

Prerequisite: 5.0 credits in ENG and 4.0 additional credits

Group 1 Literary Theory/Methods


Course Title: Seminar: Race, Ethnicity, Diasporas, Indigeneity (TBA)

Course Code: ENG426H5F | Seminar T 1-3

InstructorNatasha Vashisht

Prerequisite: 5.0 credits in ENG and 4.0 additional credits

Group 2 Race, Ethnicity, Diaspora, Indigeneity


Course Title: Seminar: Literature Pre-1700 (Early Modern Asexualities)

Course Code: ENG460H5F | Seminar W 1-3

InstructorLiza Blake

Prerequisite: 5.0 credits in ENG and 4.0 additional credits

Group 3 Literature pre-1700

Detailed Description by Instructor:
This discussion-intensive seminar will have two main goals. First, we will read and discuss modern scholarship on asexuality, the sexual orientation often characterized by or defined as a lack of sexual attraction. We will investigate asexuality as a queer identity, and talk about how the study of asexuality has the potential to bring new perspectives to queer theory. Second, we will think about what it means to look for and read for asexuality in history. Asexuality as an identity is typically dated back only to the 1960s, but we will read a variety of genres of sixteenth and seventeenth century literature, asking what it means to look for asexuality and aromanticism beyond the twentieth century. We will continually ask not just how to build an “asexual archive”—how to find traces of asexuality and aromanticism in the past—but also how the particular shapes of asexuality that we find in early modern texts might help us rethink modern allonormativity (the assumption that everyone experiences sexual attraction) and amatonormativity (the assumption that most people should be striving to be in romantic pairings or couples).

Topics of discussion include methodological conversations about historicizing sexual identities; attending to the complete spectrum of asexual and aromantic identities (demiromantics, grey-asexuals or grey-aces, etc.); asexuality and race; asexuality and disability; asexuality and the Split Attraction Model or differentiated attractions (sexual v. romantic attraction, platonic attraction, aesthetic attraction, etc.); and asexuality, theater, and performance. The class does not assume any prior knowledge of asexuality.

Selected Major Readings:

Possible readings include: William Shakespeare, Much Ado about Nothing [play]; Anon, The Four Prentices of London [play]; Margaret Cavendish, Convent of Pleasure [play]; William Shakespeare, Venus and Adonis [long narrative poem]; Thomas Nashe, “The Choice of Valentines” [short narrative poem]; John Marston, Metamorphosis of Pygmalion’s Image [erotic epyllion]; Katherine Phillips, metaphysical poetry of friendship; Abraham Cowley, The Mistress [a collection of poetry that caused Samuel Johnson to call him a “philosophical rhymer who had only ever heard of the other sex”]; C17 “Platonic Love” poetry movement and its opponents

First Three Texts / Authors to be Studied: excerpts from Julie Sondra Decker, The Invisible Orientation; Ela Przybylo “Introducing asexuality, unthinking sex”; Cameron Awkward-Rich, “A Prude’s Manifesto”

Method of Instruction: Online, synchronous, discussion-intensive seminars

Method of Evaluation: Participation and active discussion; class discussion leading; short response papers; longer research paper


Course Title: Seminar: Literature 1700-1900 (Early Women Playwrights, Aphra Behn to Joanna Baillie)

Course Code: ENG463H5F | Seminar F 1-3

InstructorTerry Robinson

Prerequisite: 5.0 credits in ENG and 4.0 additional credits

Group 4 Literature 1700-1900

Detailed Description by Instructor:
This course provides a uniquely focused exploration of dramas authored by women ca. 1660-1800. We'll read comedies, tragedies, and farces by playwrights such as Aphra Behn, Susannah Centlivre, Hannah Cowley, Elizabeth Inchbald, and Joanna Baillie. In addition to considering matters of genre, we'll think through differences between dramas written for the stage and those written for the page; explore how authors address matters political, social, and sexual; learn about the professionalization of the woman writer in the eighteenth century; and analyze scholarly criticism in relation to the dramas studied.

Selected Major Readings:
Aphra Behn, The Rover
Hannah Cowley, The Belle's Stratagem
Elizabeth Inchbald, The Massacre

First Three Texts / Authors to be Studied: Aphra Behn, Margaret Cavendish, Susannah Centlivre

Method of Instruction: Lecture and Discussion (In-Person)

Method of Evaluation: Participation; Archival Research Exercise; Essays; Other


Course Title: Seminar: Modern and Contemporary Literature (Magical Realism in Postcolonial Literature)

Course Code: ENG472H5S | Seminar W 11-1

InstructorStanka Radovic

Prerequisites: 5.0 credits in ENG and 4.0 additional credits

Group n/a