Workshops for Graduate Students

Many of our workshops can be used towards the MyGPD.

We also offer workshops on demand, so you and your colleagues can request a particular workshop and we'll do our best to arrange it for you.

Winter 2022 Workshops

Drop-in Session: EDI Statements

Date & Time: Tuesday, January 25, 2022 1:00 - 2:00 PM ET
Location: Zoom (synchronous/live) – Please register to receive the Zoom link the day before
Hosted by: RGASC and the Senior Research Associates

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Description: Are you working on your Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) Statement, or "Diversity Statement"? Perhaps you have questions or would like to discuss your draft and ideas? Come to this drop-in session to discuss your EDI Statement, whether you are in the first stages of thinking about it or later in its development.


Citation Management with Zotero, Mendeley, and Refworks

Date & Time: Thursday, February 10, 2022 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM ET
Location: Zoom (synchronous/live) – Please register to receive the Zoom link the day before
Presenter: Andrew Nicholson, Graduate Student Liaison Librarian

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Description: Gathering and organizing citations of earlier published research can take up a large amount of your time as a graduate student. Ultimately, these citations (articles, books, websites, social media, etc) may prove to be vital for your projects, reviews, and original research, especially if you are asked to provide a literature review or a bibliography to support your work. Using a bibliographic management tool can allow you to quickly save and organize your citations into project folders that are easily accessible from both your computer and the Cloud. They can also help you automatically generate in-text citations and a bibliography from your collection of references in your choice of citation style. This session will provide an overview and demonstration of three popular bibliographic management tools: Zotero, Mendeley, and Refworks.


Editing Your Work (Humanities and Social Sciences)

Date & Time: Thursday, March 10, 2022 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM ET
Location: Zoom (synchronous/live) – Please register to receive the Zoom link the day before
Presenter: Jonathan Vroom, Assistant Professor, Teaching Stream, Institute for the Study of University Pedagogy

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Description: We all know how rare it is for good and clear writing to happen in first drafts. For most of us, most of the time, it’s the editing stage (or editing stages!) that turns a collection of good ideas into a good text. In this workshop, we’ll discuss and use best practices in editing, focusing especially on working on the sentence and paragraph level. In addition to working through issues of grammar and basic syntactical rules, we’ll work on deepening your understanding of how your choices of word order and structure affect your readers by analyzing and rewriting sample material. Focusing on Humanities and Social Sciences writing, this workshop will help you write prose that is correct, that is clear, and that communicates what you want to communicate.


From Papers to Press Releases: Bringing your Research to the Rest of the World

Date & Time: Thursday, March 10, 2022 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM ET
Location: Zoom (synchronous/live) – Please register to receive the Zoom link the day before
Presenter: Farah Qaiser, Director of Research Policy, Evidence for Democracy; Philippe Devos, Director of Media Relations, U of T; Blake Eligh, staff reporter, UTM Office of Communications, and Geordon Frere, PhD Student, Chemistry

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Description: Are you curious to know how to amplify your research through media, how media outlets hear about graduate research, and how U of T can put you in touch? Join the Robert Gillespie Academic Skills Centre, the UTM Office of Communications, and U of T Communications for a workshop led by journalists and scientist communicators in our community. They’ll share their insights regarding taking your research to the world of print media. At this workshop, you will learn how to write a press release and navigate the world of media both within and outside of the university.

Speakers include Farah Qaiser, Director of Research Policy at Evidence for Democracy and MSc grad from the University of Toronto; Philippe Devos, Director of Media Relations for the University of Toronto and long-time journalist; and Blake Eligh, staff reporter with UTM's Office of Communications and recipient of the Gold National Magazine Award.


Editing Your Work (STEM)

Date & Time: Thursday, March 17, 2022 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM ET
Location: Zoom (synchronous/live) – Please register to receive the Zoom link the day before
Presenter: Michael Kaler, Assistant Professor, Teaching Stream, Institute for the Study of University Pedagogy

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Description: We all know how rare it is for good and clear writing to happen in first drafts. For most of us, most of the time, it’s the editing stage (or editing stages!) that turns a collection of good ideas into a good text. In this workshop, we’ll discuss and use best practices in editing, focusing especially on working on the sentence and paragraph level. In addition to working through issues of grammar and basic syntactical rules, we’ll work on deepening your understanding of how your choices of word order and structure affect your readers by analyzing and rewriting sample material. Focusing on writing in STEM, this workshop will help you write prose that is correct, that is clear, and that communicates what you want to communicate.


Introduction to R Part 1

Date & Time: Wednesday, March 23, 2022 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM ET
Location: Zoom (synchronous/live) – Please register to receive the Zoom link the day before
Presenter: Thomas St. Pierre

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Description: This hands-on, two-part Introduction to R and R Studio is designed for graduate students with little to no familiarity with R. The primary goal of the workshop is to provide graduate students with basic knowledge required to begin working with and analyzing data in the free statistical software package R. A laptop or desktop will be needed to participate.

In the first part of the introduction graduate students will learn about:

  • The basics of R Studio
  • Importing and exporting data
  • Data manipulation
  • Descriptive statistics

Introduction to R Part 2

Date & Time: Wednesday, March 30, 2022 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM ET
Location: Zoom (synchronous/live) – Please register to receive the Zoom link the day before
Presenter: Thomas St. Pierre

Register

Description: This hands-on, two-part Introduction to R and R Studio is designed for graduate students with little to no familiarity with R. The primary goal of the workshop is to provide graduate students with basic knowledge required to begin working with and analyzing data in the free statistical software package R. A laptop or desktop will be needed to participate.

In the second part of the introduction, graduate students will learn about:

  • Visualizing data
  • Correlation
  • T-tests and simple regression

Workshops Offered in Fall 2021

Learning Through a Screen

During the last year, online learning became the default, and even as the education begins to move back into the classroom, many materials and systems of instructional material remain online. Learning in such a way has its advantages, but also presents particular challenges. In this interactive workshop, we address these challenges and present methods for overcoming them. Participants will identify goals and use them to shape their approaches to their learning, find ways to engage attentively with material shared online, devise tactics to deal with distractions, and schedule learning most effectively. Skills and strategies learned in this workshop will help graduate students gain the most from the graduate school experience, whether in-person or not.


Using the UTM Library (Remotely) as a Graduate Student

Although COVID remains part of our lives, the UTM Library continues to provide a range of remote and in-person services to Graduate Students. This session will provide an overview of how the UTM Library can help Graduate Students locate and retrieve research materials, both from on and off-campus, and highlight some tools that can help you best manage your citations and datasets. We will also highlight some upcoming “virtual” research and technology workshops being offered by the UTM Library for Graduate Students.


Introduction to Python

Ever wanted to delve into Python for your work, but found that whichever material you tried using focused too much on a specific form of data analysis? Heard of Python packages and extensions that are supposed to apply to your work, but not sure how to put them into practice? This two-part workshop provides a general overview of Python to help you get started with writing Python code for the specific needs of your research. The workshop will cover introductory Python from the ground up before introducing object-oriented programming and how field-specific Python packages take advantage of it to create all sorts of powerful tools. In the second half, we will go over making a basic custom Python object and use it break down how exactly these tools are created. Ultimately, this workshop aims to give learners the foundational knowledge needed to take their Python journey in whichever direction they choose.


Writing a Teaching Statement for a Faculty Job Application

Come join experts who will discuss the role of the teaching statement in your academic job dossier and learn how to articulate your teaching and mentorship experience, keep track of relevant metrics and how to integrate these metrics into the statement in a meaningful way.


Data Visualisation with Tableau

Academic research today can often involve working with large amounts of tabular data. Such data may have been collected by yourself or by others, and it may come in many different formats and file sizes. Being able to visualize such data can bring greater understanding of your research and even open up new avenues to explore. This workshop will provide some pointers on creating data visualizations using Tableau.


Writing an Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Statement for a Faculty Job Application

The Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) Statement, commonly referred to as the "Diversity Statement," is an increasingly required component of academic job applications. In the first of this two-part series on EDI Statements, we will explore the purpose and characteristics of Diversity Statements. We will collectively discuss approaches for developing the values identified in our Statements of Teaching Philosophy into the Diversity Statement by reflecting on how we can align our values to experiences as evidence of our professional commitment to EDI. Participants will have an opportunity to identify connections between their research, teaching, and service to the institution's equity, diversity, and inclusion initiatives and investigate common pitfalls when writing a Diversity Statement.