Workshops for Graduate Students

Many of our workshops can be used for credit towards the completion of the Graduate Professional Skills (GPS) Program.

We offer our workshops on demand, so you and your lab mates can request a particular workshop and we'll do our best to arrange it for you.

Workshop Schedule Fall 2019

Writing a Grant/Research Proposal

Date & Time:
September 19, 2019 from 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Location: MN 5128
Presenter: Dr. Michael Kaler, Assistant Professor, Teaching Stream & Writing Specialist, RGASC
Description:

There is a lot riding on our grant applications and research proposals—they are where we present our plans for our work for years to come, and they can be the key to professional or academic opportunity. Because proposals and applications are such high stakes documents, writing them is always going to be challenging and stressful, but the process is also valuable regardless of the outcome. For one thing, writing them obliges us to think through our plans and coherently lay them out. For another thing, writing them helps us develop our abilities to communicate with a wider audience, as it requires us to present really specialized, detailed work plans in a way that will be understandable (and convincing!) even to people who might not be specialists in our own particular subdiscipline.

This workshop will give you an opportunity to think and talk about some of the principles behind making your grant or research proposal clear, convincing, and coherent to outsiders; following this, we’ll use these principles to analyze your own work— so please bring something to discuss (it doesn’t have to be finished or perfect …).

REGISTER NOW!

Writing a Literature Review

Date & Time:
September 26, 2019 from 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Location: MN 5128
Presenter: Dr. Michael Kaler, Assistant Professor, Teaching Stream & Writing Specialist, RGASC
Description:

Literature reviews are a key element of all academic writing. They lay the foundations for your own original work. A literature review allows you to situate and contextualize your research question, which enables you to make a clear and identifiable contribution to the field with your answer to that question. As well, they let you demonstrate your understanding of your field to your readers. So they’re key, but they are also difficult to write.

In this workshop, we will work with published literature reviews to help address common problematic issues with this genre of writing, such as how much (or how little) to include, how to know what you need to include, how to structure a lit review, and how to establish the overall purpose of your lit review. Then we’ll apply the insights and techniques that we developed to samples of your own work—so please bring something to discuss (it doesn’t have to be finished or perfect …).

REGISTER NOW!

Editing your Work for Science Students

Date & Time:
November 6, 2019 from 11:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m..
Location: MN 5128
Presenter: Dr. Michael Kaler, Assistant Professor, Teaching Stream & Writing Specialist, RGASC

Description:

Academic writing doesn’t have to be painful to read—but all too often it is, because while it’s one thing to know what you want to say, it’s quite another thing to say it in a way that will be clear and attractive to your reader. Given the crucial importance of writing for any field of academic work, it makes sense to ensure that your ideas are getting through to your readers as convincingly and coherently as possible.

In this workshop, we’ll look at some of the fundamental principles behind sentence and paragraph organization, focusing on your readers’ expectations: we’ll discuss what readers of English academic writing expect when they read and how to work with those expectations. Following that, we’ll apply these principles to samples of your own writing—so be sure to bring some. You'll leave this workshop with tips and ideas that will enhance your editing skills and help ensure that readers read what you're writing.

REGISTER NOW!

Editing your Work for Humanities and Social Science Students

Date & Time:
November 13, 2019 from 11:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. .
Location: MN 5128
Presenter: Dr. Michael Kaler, Assistant Professor, Teaching Stream & Writing Specialist, RGASC

Description:

Academic writing doesn’t have to be painful to read—but all too often it is, because while it’s one thing to know what you want to say, it’s quite another thing to say it in a way that will be clear and attractive to your reader. Given the crucial importance of writing for any field of academic work, it makes sense to ensure that your ideas are getting through to your readers as convincingly and coherently as possible.

In this workshop, we’ll look at some of the fundamental principles behind sentence and paragraph organization, focusing on your readers’ expectations: we’ll discuss what readers of English academic writing expect when they read and how to work with those expectations. Following that, we’ll apply these principles to samples of your own writing—so be sure to bring some. You'll leave this workshop with tips and ideas that will enhance your editing skills and help ensure that readers read what you're writing.

REGISTER NOW!