Past Events

Fall 2022

Beyond The Reading List: Pedagogies of Belonging

September 21, 2022 from 12:00 - 1:00 pm (via Zoom) 

Faciltated by Ann Gagné, Educational Developer, Universal Design for Learning & Accessible Pedagogies, and Amanda Brijmohan, Educational Developer, Assessment and Scholarship of Teaching and Learning 

In this session, participants will have the opportunity to reflect on ways to support 2SLGBTQ+ learners through inclusive pedagogy that takes into account pronoun use, assessment examples, and word choice. We will also discuss conducting scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) research that is more inclusive of demographics. Participants will leave the session with strategies to support belonging in educational spaces for 2SLGBTQ+ learners. 


Summer 2022

Summer Camp for Instructors (online)

July 19th, 20th, and 21st from 9:00am - 12:00pm 

Join us for summer camp! This year's summer camp will be three daily facilitated synchronous sessions from 9am-12pm EDT where we will discuss pedagogy, strategies, activities, and assessments for the courses you are teaching. You will also have opportunities to meet colleagues and workshop ideas.


A Celebration of Teaching Excellence at UTM (online)

Monday, May 9th 2022 from 10:00am - 12:00pm (BBQ lunch hosted in-person from 12:00pm - 1:00pm in the CCT Courtyard) 

Please join us for a celebration of teaching excellence. We will be hearing from recent UTM and provincial teaching award recipients, followed by a panel discussion about teaching and learning at UTM. We’ll be celebrating the teaching and scholarly achievements of Mairi Cowan, Nicole Laliberté, Vivienne Luk, Will Huggon, Julianna Chianelli, and Sherry Fukuzawa.


Term-End Reflection (in-person)

Monday, May 9th 2022 from 1:00pm - 2:00pm  (BBQ lunch hosted from 12:00pm - 1:00pm in the CCT Courtyard) 

Facilitated by Fiona Rawle, Associate Dean, Undergraduate, and Director, Robert Gillespie Academic Skills Centre, and Associate Professor, Teaching Stream, Department of Biology; Ann Gagné, Educational Developer (Universal Design for Learning), Robert Gillespie Academic Skills Centre, Institute for the Study of University Pedagogy ; and Dianne Ashbourne, Educational Developer, Robert Gillespie Academic Skills Centre, Institute for the Study of University Pedagogy 

Connect with your colleagues to reflect on this past year in an interactive, collaborative session. This session will provide an opportunity to share pedagogical strategies that worked well and to ask your colleagues for suggestions to address challenges that you encountered during the term. 


Winter 2022

Spotlight on Teaching in the Arts and Humanities (online)

Wednesday, January 26th from 2:00pm - 3:00pm   

This event provides an opportunity for instructors to share teaching strategies and resources with colleagues who share their disciplinary context. It is also an opportunity for instructors from other disciplinary contexts to gather new ideas. The session will consist of four 10-15 minute presentations with an opportunity to ask questions after each presentation.

Contributors: 

  • Kate Maddalena, Assistant Professor, Teaching Stream, Institute of Communication, Culture, Information & Technology

Encouraging Students to Engage Creatively with Theory: a Holistic Rubric

Engaging with theory in the humanities is fun, creative, and intellectually risky work. When students are focused on getting it right for a mark, they miss the point of theory. This simple, holistic assessment method--a very simple "ungrading" approach--encourages and rewards risk-taking and creativity for B and A-level marks. 

  • Ken Derry, Associate Professor, Teaching Stream, Historical Studies

Silver Linings: Online Pandemic Teaching Practices I Will Keep Using

Teaching online during a global pandemic for almost two years has been  — to put it mildly — incredibly challenging, in many (often highly inequitable) ways. But there are practices and perspectives I learned from online teaching in this crisis that I think improved my classes, and helped make me a better teacher. I plan to continue as many of these as I can when I return to in-person teaching — including recording lectures, re-thinking exams, using checklists, removing late penalties, and being as kind as possible.


Spotlight on Teaching in Social Science (online)

Thursday, February 17th from 2:00pm - 3:00pm

This event provides an opportunity for instructors to share teaching strategies and resources with colleagues who share their disciplinary context. It is also an opportunity for instructors from other disciplinary contexts to gather new ideas. The session will consist of four 10-minute presentations with an opportunity to ask questions after each presentation.

Contributors: 

  • Alison Smith, Assistant Professor, Political Science

I will be talking about a creative book review assignment I assigned this term in my POL318 class, Power and Conflict in Federalism. The book review was for works of fiction. I gave students the option of engaging with the work in any form or medium they wanted to - I got many formal book reviews, but also a number of podcasts, three paintings, several poems, and even a song! Artistic works were accompanied with an "artist's statement" in which they explained their work and how the book helped them to better understand Canadian politics. In addition to allowing students to engage with a novel and express themselves creatively, the books we reviewed allowed for really great examples of policy failures and power struggles that we covered in class, giving students a very clear understanding of how policies affect different people.


Spotlight on Teaching in STEM (online)

Tuesday, March 1st from 2:00pm - 3:30pm

This event provides an opportunity for instructors to share teaching strategies and resources with colleagues who share their disciplinary context. It is also an opportunity for instructors from other disciplinary contexts to gather new ideas. The session will consist of four 10-minute presentations with an opportunity to ask questions after each presentation.

Contributors: 

  • Mike Pawliuk, Assistant Professor, Teaching Stream, CLTA, Mathematical and Computational Sciences

In Fall 2021 I taught a third year math course (MAT344 Intro to Combinatorics) without formal assignments, tests, or an exam. Students had "radical freedom" to create any portfolio of work they wanted to show their learning in the course. It went very well, and I'll discuss the important lessons I learned.

  • Jaimal Thind, Assistant Professor, Teaching Stream, Mathematical and Computational Sciences & Alexander Rennet, Assistant Professor, Teaching Stream, Mathematical and Computational Sciences

In 2019 the speakers (together with P. Glynn-Adey and M. Pawliuk) were involved in an active learning redesign of a large, multi-sectioned introductory mathematics course. We will discuss the collaborative nature of this redesign, its implementation, an accompanying SoTL project, and how this redesign helped us create an engaging online course experience during the pandemic. 

  • Pooja Vashisth, Assistant Professor, Teaching Stream, CLTA, Mathematical and Computational Sciences

Using tangibles to teach STEM concepts

STEM subjects (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics), programming, computational thinking, etc. are more than buzzwords. Although not new, there is a clear interest from the academic community in using tangibles to emphasize core concepts. Using tangibles like cards help stimulate computational thinking necessary to develop the problem solving skills. This method results in more engagement by providing better opportunities for exploration. There are several clear applications of using cards for teaching STEM concepts. We will take a look at some of them at the showcase.

  • Tingting Zhu, Assistant Professor, Teaching Stream, Department of Geography, Geomatics and Environment & Department of Mathematical and Computational Sciences

As student engagement is a crucial predictor of learning outcomes in an online learning environment, this study investigates the use of interactive storytelling lecture trailers (ISLTs) as an engagement tool. The ISLTs were 2-3 minutes in length that serve as a preview for the lecture content. The trailers interweaved the actions and dialogues between the instructor and another character that is relevant to course topics in telling a cohesive story. Observational data and survey show that ISLTs are effective means for enhancing students’ behavioral, emotional, and student-instructor engagement. 


Preparing the Teaching Dossier (online)

Thursday, March 24th from 1:00pm - 3:00pm

Facilitated by Dianne Ashbourne, Educational Developer, Robert Gillespie Academic Skills Centre, Institute for the Study of University Pedagogy 

At the University of Toronto, teaching dossiers must be submitted as part of the review process for tenure review or continuing status review. This session will provide an overview of the content and structure of an effective teaching dossier, focusing on dossiers prepared for a review process, and with an emphasis on how to align this document with divisional and institutional expectations. Session participants will review the distinctive qualities of a teaching dossier, and will develop a plan for assembling and strengthening their own dossiers. They will also be led through the first steps of composing a Statement of Teaching Philosophy. 


Writing an EDI Statement for your Teaching Dossier 

Tuesday, March 29th from 11:00am - 12:00pm 

Facilitated by Ann Gagné, Educational Developer (Universal Design for Learning), Robert Gillespie Academic Skills Centre, Institute for the Study of University Pedagogy 

This session will highlight the literature on writing EDI statements and allow space for discussion of how to demonstrate connections to equity, diversity, and inclusion practices in your pedagogy.  


Beyond Fill in the Blanks: Reconciliation, Indigenization, and Decolonization in the Context of Higher Education

Wednesday, March 30 from 2:00pm – 3:00pm

In partnership with the UTM Indigenous Centre  

Facilitated by Danielle Lorenz, Department of Educational Policy Studies, University of Alberta

Following the release of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada's Final Report and Calls to Action in 2015, post-secondary institutions across the country began to make institutional commitments to reconciliation. More recently, with the advent of institutional equity, diversity, and inclusion policies, Indigenization and decolonization have also become priorities. This has resulted in many higher education professionals having questions about what they should and should not be doing. For instance,

  • What do reconciliation, Indigenization, and decolonization mean in the context of post-secondary classrooms, course design, and pedagogy?
  • How does one do reconciliation, Indigenization, and/or decolonization?
  • How does one avoid causing harm when engaging in reconciliation, Indigenization, and/or decolonization praxis?

This interactive presentation discusses these ideas as well as the realities of engaging in reconciliation, Indigenization, and decolonization in higher education; and explores the role of humility in learning communities. 


Curriculum Mapping 

Monday, April 4th from 1:00pm – 2:00pm  

Facilitated by Fiona Rawle, Associate Dean, Undergraduate, and Director, Robert Gillespie Academic Skills Centre, and Professor, Teaching Stream, Department of Biology 

This workshop will outline how to engage in effective curriculum mapping, and will highlight the opportunities that can arise from the mapping process and dissemination of the maps themselves. We will discuss mapping at the assignment, course, and program level, and will explore different ways to both use and disseminate curricular maps. 


Spotlight on Teaching in Management and Economics 

Tuesday, April 26th from 2:00pm - 3:00pm

This event provides an opportunity for instructors to share teaching strategies and resources with colleagues who share their disciplinary context. It is also an opportunity for instructors from other disciplinary contexts to gather new ideas. The session will consist of four 10-minute presentations with an opportunity to ask questions after each presentation.

Contributors: 

  • Otto Yung, Assistant Professor, Teaching Stream, Department of Management

Integrating coding to develop a life-long transferable skill

In my talk I will share my experience of integrating coding into a social science curriculum (e.g., for finance, accounting, and management students). I will also share my teaching strategies (in-person and online) and assessments used to introduce and to build a foundation in a non-intimidating manner through community. Finally, I will discuss four (4) new courses introduced into the curriculum. 


Fall 2021

UTM Ready, Set, Teach

September 1st from 10am - 12pm 

The fall term can bring both excitement and uncertainty, but Ready, Set, Teach will help set you up for success as you jump into the new term. This event is meant to provide opportunities to learn from and with other UTM instructors. The theme for this year's Ready, Set, Teach is "About Community for Community". The event schedule can be found here


Online Help Session for Instructors

September 1st from 12pm - 1pm 

Please join us for a drop-in online session to share solutions and discuss challenges.


Equity in my discipline: Social Science & STEM  (online)

Panelists: 

  • Martha Balaguera, Assistant Professor, Political Science 
  • Jerry Flores, Assistant Professor, Sociology 
  • Andrew Petersen, Associate Professor, Teaching Stream,  Mathematical & Computational Sciences 
  • Vera Velasco, co-founder of Filipinos in Canada - Academics, Researchers and Scholars (FiCARS) association 

In this session, panelists will discuss how equity is part of the pedagogy, research, and community in their respective disciplines.  The session will provide participants opportunities to reflect on equity practice gaps and what specific equity initiatives relate to their teaching & learning and research. 


Equity in my discipline:  Management & Economics and Arts & Humanities (online)

Panelists:

  • Sonia Kang, Associate Professor, Management, Canada Research Chair in Identity, Diversity, and Inclusion 
  • Anjuli Raza Kolb, Associate Professor, English and Drama 
  • Ellyn Walker, Acting Director/Curator, Blackwood Gallery, Assistant Professor, Teaching Stream, Department of Visual Studies 

In this session, panelists will discuss how equity is part of the pedagogy, research, and community in their respective disciplines.  The session will provide participants opportunities to reflect on equity practice gaps and what equity specific initiatives relate to their teaching & learning and research.  


Term-End Reflection (online)

Tuesday, December 7th from 11:00am - 12:30pm  

Facilitated by Fiona Rawle, Associate Dean, Undergraduate, and Director, Robert Gillespie Academic Skills Centre, and Associate Professor, Teaching Stream, Department of Biology; Ann Gagné, Educational Developer (Universal Design for Learning), Robert Gillespie Academic Skills Centre, Institute for the Study of University Pedagogy ; and Dianne Ashbourne, Educational Developer, Robert Gillespie Academic Skills Centre, Institute for the Study of University Pedagogy 

Connect with your colleagues to reflect on this past year in an interactive, collaborative session. This session will provide an opportunity to share pedagogical strategies that worked well and to ask your colleagues for suggestions to address challenges that you encountered during the term.