Home   Index to Field Studies   Up   Tables:   1998:  I a,  I b   1995   1980+  

left arrowarrow left1998, Table I b  -  Page 2
Gliderport in region of Lexington, Nebraska;  September 13, 16 1998;
Co-ordinates (approx.) = 4050'N, 9950'W;  Altitude (approx.)= 728 msl;  
Magnetic Declination = 8E (Add 8 for True);  Magnetic Inclination = 69;  
Observer:  Steve Loudon
Obs.    Species    Date
(Time)
Flight Behavior Weather Field Notes
I     II     III IV Va Vb Part 1 Part 2 Part 3
Obs.
 Alt.*  
Type
of Flt.
Horiz.
Path
Vert.
Path
Mag.
Bear.
Mag.
Head.
Wind
Dir.
 Wind 
Vel.
Amb.
Temp.
Thrm.
Act.
Cloud 
Types 
1 Danaus plexippus Sept. 13 1,524 m
(4,000 ft)
- - - - - - - - yes
(assumed)
-

Pilots Log:  Monarch at 4,000 ft agl**

2

D. plexippus

Sept. 16 1,494 m
(4,900 ft)
soaring - - - - - - - yes - Pilots Log:  Lots of monarchs at 4,900 ft agl  soaring in strong lift  with corn husks (and) flapping only to avid collision...
*Observed altitude above the ground.  **agl = Above Ground Level

Comments by Gibo:  I assumed that thermals were present on Sept. 13 because the standard aero tow for a glider is only to 2,000 ft.   Encountering large bits of debris that have been carried aloft in a strong thermal is not that unusual an experience for glider pilots.    Finally, Steve Loudon had a letter on page 5 of   the September issue of Soaring Magazine informing SSA (Soaring Society of America) members about his gliding club in Nebraska and showing off  their newly restored Ka-8B glider.   Hopefully, the club members  will see many monarch butterflies over the years from this classic "floater".

To Online Data Entry Form for Glider Pilots