DHT - Curriculum Overview

MBiotech’s Digital Health Technology (DHT) curriculum is comprised of both required courses (which all students must take), as well as elective courses (which students may choose to take to meet their elective credit requirement, or simply out of interest). 


Credit Requirements

Students enrolled in DHT steam of MBiotech are required to complete 9·0 graduate course credits over a 24-month period on a full time basis. These 9·0 credits are comprised of the following:

  • 8 Science courses (0·5 credits each, for a total of 4·0 credits)
  • 3 Business courses (0·5 credits each, for a total of 1·5 credits)
  • 2 Work Term courses (1.0 credits year term for a total of 2·0 credits)
  • Electives (1·5 credits)


Required Courses

YEAR 1

Seminar Series (BTC16x0)
BTC1600H  Seminar in Bioscience/Biotechnology I { Sep-Dec }

Digital Health Series (BTC18xx)
BTC1842H  Medical Device Reimbursement { May-Jun }
BTC1859H  Data Science in Health I { May-Jun }
BTC1877H  Data Science in Health II { Sep-Dec }
BTC1882H  Digital Ethnography in Health { Jan-Apr }
BTC1895H  Introduction to IT Consulting & Web Design Jan-Apr }

Business Series (BTC20x0)
BTC2000H  Effective Management Practices { May-Dec }
BTC2010H  Fundamentals of Managerial Concepts { Sep-Dec }

Biomedical Series (MSC201x)
MSC2011H  Special Topics in Biomedical Communications { May-Aug 
MSC2019H › Information & Data Visualization in Science & Medicine { Jan-Apr }

YEAR 2

Seminar Series (BTC16x0)
BTC1610H › Seminar in Bioscience/Biotechnology II { Sep-Dec }

Digital Health Series (BTC18xx)
BTC1899H  Digital Health Technology { Jan-Apr }

Work Term Series (BTC19x0)
BTC1900Y  Work Term I { May-Aug }
BTC1910Y  Work Term II { Sep-Dec }

Business Series (BTC20x0)
BTC2030H  Management of Technological Innovation { Jan-Apr }


Electives

Digital Health Series (BTC18xx)
BTC1889H  Deep Learning in Health COMING SOON }

Work Term Series (BTC19x0)
BTC1920Y  Work Term III Jan-Apr }

Special Topics Series (BTC21x0)
BTC2120H  Decision Analytics in Business, Healthcare & Management Jan-Apr }

IMI Series (IMIxxxx)
IMI3001H  Biocommercialisation I: Analysis of Technology Driven Innovation Sep-Dec }



Course Descriptions

 

MSC2011H  Special Topics in Biomedical Communications: Coding in R Language
Session: Summer
Instructor: tbd
Credits: 0·5 (required)

Course Description:
This course teaches basic programming skills to non-programmers and introduces them to the value of those skills. Students will learn about the various roles of programming languages and participate in discussions about the purpose of programming including task automation and interactive Web design. Students will use the language of R. Students will be introduced to elementary data types, control flow and functions as well as functional and object oriented programming. Students will practice approaches to problem solving with computer programs and learn debugging strategies. By the end of the course, students are expected to create a program that helps them solve a reasonable problem or perform a task in their own domain of study.
To top


BTC1842H  Medical Device Reimbursement
Session: Summer
Instructor: tbd
Credits: 0·5 (required)

Course Description:
Medical Device Reimbursement for medical devices is critical for successful product commercialization. This course discusses the regulatory and reimbursement landscape in Canada and presents a medical device reimbursement framework that can be applied when seeking medical device reimbursement. The framework focuses on the medical device and the reimbursement environment where payment is being sought. The course involves lectures and reimbursement challenges. Teams of students will conduct reimbursement assessments and develop and present reimbursement plans for real-world medical device reimbursement. At the conclusion of the course, students will have the knowledge and tools to build a medical device reimbursement plan.
To top


BTC1859H  Data Science in Health I
Session:
Summer
Instructor: Nicholas Mitsakakis
Credits: 0·5 (required)

Course Description:
This course will introduce students to biostatistics. This course is intended for both students new to the area and those with prior training.

A key component of the course will involve learning to program in R in order to conduct statistical analysis. Students will have both individual and team assignments to provide practice coding in R. R is one of the main languages used today in performing statistical analysis. Comfort with R will be helpful in learning other languages in the future in a statistical context. Off-the-shelf software, while more convenient, may not be available in the work environment you find yourself in and certain tests you may need, may not be available in any such software. Thus, learning to code is the best path forward for future practitioners of data science.

Statistical and data analysis methods covered will start with descriptive statistics and basic univariate tests and continue to more advanced regression models. It is key that students are able to identify which methods to apply to what kind of data set, the assumptions of the model and how to interpret the output. Special emphasis in the course will be placed on critical thinking around analytical methods to be used.
To top


BTC2000H  Effective Management Practices
Session: Summer & Fall
Instructor: Ann Armstrong
Credits: 0·5 (required)

Course Description:
This course introduces students to the basic skills and concepts needed to become an effective member of an organization. It focuses on (1) team working skills, (2) fundamental managerial skills, and (3) career management skills. The course is participative in its design and requires students to apply the material in the course. It provides the first opportunity for a team approach to problem solving and will provide a realistic preview of the work place.

This course will be used to define and organise groups of students who will work in teams to complete the subsequent laboratory modules.
To top


BTC1877H  Data Science in Health II
Session: Fall
Instructor: Nicholas Mitsakakis
Credits: 0·5 (required)

Course Description:
This graduate course takes students with a basic background in statistics and equips them to tackle massive data sets in health. The focus will be on advanced statistical tests in machine learning and assemble such tests by accessing and validating publicly available code in the R programming language and creating their own code as needed. Students will also learn additional techniques pertaining web scraping, working with unstructured data, data cleaning and data governance building upon the course Data Science in Health Part I. The course will emphasize creative approaches to analyzing data and how to be critical of misleading analysis. Each class will involve both lecture and weekly tutorial assignments. The major project for the course will involve a large health data set that teams will compete to analyze.
To top


BTC2010H  Fundamentals of Managerial Concepts 
Session: Fall
Instructor: Kevin Yousie
Credits: 0·5 (required)

Course Description:
This foundational course introduces students to a broad range of the critical managerial concepts that are required to operate successfully in today’s biotechnologically focused organizations. Topics covered include forms of business ownership, an introduction to financial statements, financial statement analysis, time value of money, marketing management, market segmentation, product positioning, the marketing mix, pricing decisions, channel and marketing communications management, as well as some aspects of organizational behaviour and strategic management. Theory and application are combined through the use of readings, case studies, presentations and a group project.
To top


BTC1600HY  Seminar in Bioscience/Biotechnology I (first year)
BTC1610HY  Seminar in Bioscience/Biotechnology II (second year)
Session: Fall
Course Instructor: Duncan Jones
Credits: 0·5 (required)

Course Description:
The Biopartnering Seminar is a program requirement for all MBiotech students — regardless of program stream. BTC1600H and BTC1610H are held in conjunction with one another, meaning all students (regardless of year or program stream) attend the seminar on the same date and time. The seminar is held once per week during the Fall semester, on Tuesday evenings for approximately two hours. It is comprised of both student presentations as well as presentations by speakers from industry and academic institutions. All students registered in the Program are expected to attend all seminars in each of their two years and to participate in discussions of the topics that are presented during their residency in the Program. Each student will participate in at least one formal group presentation, usually in their first year, and will complete other academic requirements (such as critiques or team mentoring in the senior year) throughout the series. The topics presented in this course will range from scientific (latest technologies and research, analysis of pre-clinical and clinical data) to business-oriented issues (e.g., market strategies for pharma and biotechnology products, government regulations, intellectual property, finance, ethics, etc.).
To top


BTC1882H  Digital Ethnography in Health
Session: Winter
Instructor: Jayson Parker
Credits: 0·5 (required)

Course Description:
This graduate course examines how social media feeds can be analyzed to provide insight into health-related products. Various software tools (e.g., SysmosTM, Youtube analyticsTM, Google, AnalyticsTM, AffinoTM) will be introduced that can be used to analyze social media feeds to build a profile of the kinds of participants interested in the product, and the network of interactions between them. For example, what kind of demographic is following a medical product and what kind of experts appear to be influencing the perceptions of the product? The course will also introduce some basic health and regulatory concepts that will impact how data is analyzed in the digital world in a health context. The course will involve team-based learning and students will work on a major project that will define their experience in the course. 
To top


BTC1895H  Introduction to IT Consulting & Web Design
Session: Winter
Instructor: TBC
Credits: 0·5 (required)

Course Description:
Information Technology (IT) Consulting is a growing profession that embodies the use of computer-supported collaborative tools in the execution of business functions. In this course students engage with the principles of Computer Supported Co-operative Work (CSCW) through an experiential opportunity to work with a real client. Students create an IT Consulting company and take on the role of consultants, learning core skills (soft and hard) necessary for this profession, including client management, communication, ideation, analysis and solution development, project management, presentation skills and web design. Using case studies we discuss consulting lessons learned and problems to avoid within the context of industry best practices. Student teams will also advance their case by citing relevant best in class examples.
To top


MSC2019H  Infomation & Data Visualization in Science & Medicine
Session: Winter
Instructor: TBC
Credits: 0·5 (required)

Course Description:
This course addresses the fundamental principles of information visualization, including a discussion of human visual perception, cognition and approaches to graphic representation. This course will include weekly lectures and seminars, required readings, student presentations and a term paper. Topics will include the accurate representation of numerical and statistical data, innovative approaches to visual representation and appropriate use of design elements for clarity and legibility. Practical application of course material will require students to develop visualizations that yield insight into complex biomedical subject matter and successfully communicate to a range of audiences.
To top


BTC 1900Y / 1910Y / 1920Y  Work Terms I, II & III
Summer & Fall (preparatory requirements)
Session: Winter (Work Term start)
Instructor: Leigh Revers
Coordinator: Nazeem Shamsuddin
Credits: 2·0 (Work Term I and II are required)

Course Description:
The course is designed to enable the students to gain a more in-depth appreciation and understanding of the biotechnology and biopharmaceutical industry in a corporate and/or industrial setting and to apply their knowledge and skills in an industry setting. Students are expected to be complete two four-month full-time work terms that have been coordinated by the course coordinator to ensure that the role, responsibilities and activities are at a graduate level. Credit-granting responsibilities reside with the course instructor, who seeks input from the course coordinator. 

Required preparatory exercises and assignments must be completed in the Summer and Fall sessions, leading up to the start of the work term in Winter, in order for students to qualify for the first Work Term itself. These preparatory requriements can involve resume workshops, one-on-one meetings with the Placement Team, attendance at the annual Career Day and more.

Students in Work Term II may continue with the same employer from their first work term or with a new employer or department. Evaluation of students’ performance and their work experiences will be done in a manner similar to that of the first work placement. Students will receive a credit/no credit grade for their second work term. Note: BTC1920Y, Work Term III is an optional elective.
To top


BTC1899H  Digital Health Technology
Session: Winter
Instructor: Jayson Parker
Credits: 0·5 (required)

Course Description:
Digital health technologies is a broad area that refers to the transmission and storage of both medical and health related data (e.g., fitness trackers, medical and health apps, electronic medical records, medical device implants with telemetry). This course will explore current products in this space and review concept behind them as they pertain to big data in health, regulation of medical devices and drugs, privacy regulation, product safety, usability and hazard analysis. Areas of application discussed include aging at home, dementia, diabetes and physical fitness. The major project will involve a massive health data set analyzed by teams of students. The course is open to graduate students from other departments who have some background in health or biology.


BTC2030H  Management of Technological Innovation

Session: Winter
Instructor: Ruben Gaetani
Credits: 0·5 (required)

Course Description:
This is a course in innovation and entrepreneurship, intended in a very broad way. The overall philosophy of the course is that having a good idea, which could possibly create value, is often not enough unless you are able to capture at least part of the created value and deliver it to your customers. Therefore a good idea also requires innovations in the organizational form, the way we compete, how we obtain financial resources and so on. All of these themes need to be analyzed in order to understand how an idea can be successful in the market. In addition, these challenges are for the most part common to established firms as well. Thus we will stress these similarities but also study the differences between developing a new idea in a stand-alone company and in an established firm. The course is case and discussion based. Teams will prepare, as their final assignment, a business plan either for a new venture or to create a new strategic business unit within a larger organization, in the bio-pharmaceutical or medical sector.
To top


IMI3001H  Biocommercialization I: Analysis of Technology Driven Innovation
Session:
Fall and Winter
Credits: 0·5 (elective)

Course Description:
This is an IMI elective course. In this course, students will learn about the formation, financing and management of early-stage (bio) technology ventures. This process includes a series of close interactions with such start-ups and their potential seed investors. 

The course starts with a thorough introduction to frameworks and processes for analyzing early stage ventures, including the ‘3C’s + P framework’, and the ‘OUTSIDE-IMPACTS’ framework. 

We then turn the course focus on the product concept, development and commercialization phases which companies need to consider in bringing their product through the regulatory pathway. This course is delivered via lectures, small business presentations and team reports which evaluate the technical and business components of the presentations. The primary aim of this course is to expose the students to a wide range of interdisciplinary elements that contribute to the start-up and functioning of a biotech corporation. The secondary aims are to introduce the students to individuals currently working in the industry, and give them the opportunity to learn lessons based on real-life workplace experiences. Ultimately, this will help students to develop the optimal strategy for a new venture.

Teams are expected to be drawn largely from the Master of Sustainability, Master of Management Innovation and the Master of Biotechnology programs. Depending on the complement of students, we may also choose startup companies who are outside the Biotech arena. There will be two instructors in this course, hailing from both the business sector and science and technology. 

We anticipate working closely with ICube, RIC, MARs and local businesses in this course.

Classes will be held one to twoo times per month in the fall and winter 6:30-9 p.m. on Monday evenings. Recommended preparation for this course: Three essays by Paul Graham, http://www.paulgraham.com/
To top