News

Fruit flies are LinkedIn: Genes may determine social skills that could shed light on human behaviour

23 Jul 2012 - 11:27am
A close-up of two fruit flies

The fruit flies hovering around your kitchen compost bin have an active social life.  As they eat, court and fight, the flies change their behavior depending on who they hang out with—just as humans do.

Crime scene campers learn investigation techniques

19 Jul 2012 - 3:06pm
Children investigating the interior of a car

When 10-year-old Ryan snapped on his blue latex gloves and ducked under the police tape, he discovered the scene of a robbery: a laptop, wallet, television and jar full of Mrs. Baker’s home-made cookies had been stolen in broad daylight.

Ryan, and 18 other junior sleuths, tried to piece together what happened as part of their activities at U of T Mississauga’s forensic science summer camp.

Street View opens campus to armchair explorers

17 Jul 2012 - 9:11am
A smiling man pedals, pulling a large camera mounted to a post on a specialized bike used to capture images for Google Street View

What has three wheels, nine ‘eyes’ and weighs 250 pounds?

A Google Street View tricycle—a high-tech trike rigged with nine directional cameras, a GPS unit and three laser scanners.

The cycle-mounted camera system snaps 360-degree photos anywhere a person can walk, giving viewers a peek at places that cars can’t reach: national parks, monuments, zoos, and, by the end of this year, the lush footpaths of the University of Toronto Mississauga. 

CIHR awards to support research in child behaviour, disease-related proteins

3 Jul 2012 - 10:11am
Image of Tina Malti and Voula Kanelis

The innovative health research of two University of Toronto Mississauga professors has been recognized with prestigious New Investigator Awards from the Canadian Institutes for Health Research (CIHR).

Tina Malti, assistant professor in the Department of Psychology and Voula Kanelis, assistant professor in the Department of Chemical and Physical Sciences, will each receive funding of $60,000 per year for five years.

“The award is a tremendous honour, and will make a huge difference in the amount of time I’m able to spend on my research,” says Malti.

Cancer Sleuth: École Polytechnique award helps PhD student study disease

26 Jun 2012 - 4:23pm
Image of Miriam Avadasian

When Miriam Avadisian picked up her cell phone and learned that she had won a prestigious Canadian graduate award, her research group surrounded her and cheered so loudly that she could barely hear the details of her prize.

Avadisian is the 2012 recipient of the 1989 École Polytechnique Commemorative Award. The award, presented by the Canadian Federation of University Women (CFUW), commemorates the 14 women murdered at Montréal’s École Polytechnique and bestows $7,000 to recognize important doctoral-level studies relevant to women.

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