2024-2025 English Courses and Descriptions

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*The Course Schedules below are subject to change pending enrolment changes. Detailed course descriptions by instructors are added when available and are also subject to change.

**Please consult the Registrar's Time Table for mode of delivery for courses.


First-Year Courses

Fall Term

Winter Term


Course Title: Effective Writing LEC0101

Course Code: ENG100H5F | Lecture MWF 9-10

Instructor: TBD

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here.

Group n/a


Course Title: Effective Writing LEC0102

Course Code: ENG100H5F | Lecture T 9-10, R 9-11 (ONLINE)

Instructor: TBD

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here.

Group n/a


Course Title: Effective Writing LEC0103

Course Code: ENG100H5F | Lecture W 6-9

InstructorChester Scoville

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here.

Group n/a

Detailed Description by Instructor: This course provides practical tools for writing in university and beyond, with a special focus on writing about literature. Students will gain experience in generating ideas, clarifying insights, structuring arguments, composing paragraphs and sentences, critiquing and revising their writing and communicating effectively to diverse audiences. This course does not count toward any English program, but does provide foundational tools for the writing of essays in any program in the humanities.

Selected Major Readings: The Broadview Pocket Guide to Writing, by Doug Babington et al. Other readings will be available on Quercus.

Method of Instruction: Interactive lecture/Workshop

Method of Evaluation: Scaffolded short writing assignments building to a final portfolio. No final exam.

Creative writing component: Yes


Course Title: Effective Writing LEC0101

Course Code: ENG100H5S | Lecture MWF 10-11

Instructor: Julia Boyd

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here.

Group n/a


Course Code: ENG100H5S LEC0102

Course Code: ENG100H5S | | Lecture M 6-9

Instructor: Chester Scoville

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here.

Group n/a

Detailed Description by Instructor: This course provides practical tools for writing in university and beyond, with a special focus on writing about literature. Students will gain experience in generating ideas, clarifying insights, structuring arguments, composing paragraphs and sentences, critiquing and revising their writing and communicating effectively to diverse audiences. This course does not count toward any English program, but does provide foundational tools for the writing of essays in any program in the humanities.

Selected Major Readings: The Broadview Pocket Guide to Writing, by Doug Babington et al. Other readings will be available on Quercus.

Method of Instruction: Interactive lecture/Workshop

Method of Evaluation: Scaffolded short writing assignments building to a final portfolio. No final exam.

Creative writing component: Yes


Course Title: Effective Writing LEC0103

Course Code: ENG100H5S | Lecture T 9-10, R 9-11 (ONLINE)

Instructor: TBD

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here.

Group n/a

 


Course Title: How to Read Critically

Course Code: ENG101H5F | Lecture MW 9-10 | Tutorials M 10-11, M 12-1, W 10-11, W 12-1

Instructor: Thomas Laughlin

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group 1 Literary Theory/Methods


Course Title: How to Research Literature

Course Code: ENG102H5S | Lecture MW 9-10 | Tutorials M 10-11, W 12-1

Instructor:  TBD

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Group n/a


Course Title: Literature & Social Change

Course Code: ENG104H5F | Lecture MW10-11 | Tutorials M 11-12, M 2-3

Instructor: Julia Boyd

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group n/a


Course Title: Introduction to World Literatures

Course Code: ENG105H5S | Lecture TR 10-11 | Tutorials R 11-12, R 2-3

Instructor: TBD

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Group n/a


Course Title: Narrative

Course Code: ENG110H5F | Lecture MW 11-12 | Tutorials W 12-1, W 2-3, W 3-4

InstructorChester Scoville

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group n/a

Detailed Description by Instructor: Thomas King says, “The truth about stories is that’s all we are.” This course will examine the phenomenon of the story both as an art form and as a tool that people use to make sense of their lives in the world. We will focus on literary narrative as a particularly rich variety, but our analyses will apply broadly, to narratives found in history, law, politics, and more. As an introductory English course, ENG110 will also focus on student writing and analytical techniques, so that students may begin to master the art of the scholarly essay. By the end of the course, students should be able to construct and present analytical arguments in forms appropriate to literary studies and other humanistic disciplines.

Selected Major Readings: Hemingway, “A Clean, Well-Lighted Place”; James, The Turn of the Screw; Clarke, Piranesi; Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway.

First Three Texts/Authors to be Studied: Hemingway, James, Le Guin

Method of Instruction: Lecture with Tutorials

Method of Evaluation: Scaffolded short writing assignments capped by a final paper and final exam. Participation in tutorials will also be counted.

Creative writing component: No


Course Title: Narrative

Course Code: ENG110H5S | Lecture MW 1-2 | Tutorials W 2-3, W 4-5

InstructorChester Scoville

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group n/a

Detailed Description by Instructor: Thomas King says, “The truth about stories is that’s all we are.” This course will examine the phenomenon of the story both as an art form and as a tool that people use to make sense of their lives in the world. We will focus on literary narrative as a particularly rich variety, but our analyses will apply broadly, to narratives found in history, law, politics, and more. As an introductory English course, ENG110 will also focus on student writing and analytical techniques, so that students may begin to master the art of the scholarly essay. By the end of the course, students should be able to construct and present analytical arguments in forms appropriate to literary studies and other humanistic disciplines.

Selected Major Readings: Hemingway, “A Clean, Well-Lighted Place”; James, The Turn of the Screw; Clarke, Piranesi; Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway.

First Three Texts/Authors to be Studied: Hemingway, James, Le Guin

Method of Instruction: Lecture with Tutorials

Method of Evaluation: Scaffolded short writing assignments capped by a final paper and final exam. Participation in tutorials will also be counted

Creative writing component: No


Course Title: Traditions of Theatre and Drama

Course Code: ENG121H5F | Lecture MW 11-12 | Tutorials W 12-1, W 2-3

Instructor: Holger Syme

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group n/a


Course Title: Modern and Contemporary Theatre and Drama

Course Code: ENG122H5S | Lecture MW 11-12 | Tutorials W 12-1, W 2-3

Instructor: TBD

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group n/a


Second-Year Courses

Fall Term

Winter Term


Course Title: British Literature in the World I: Medieval to Eighteenth-Century

Course Code: ENG202H5F | Lecture TR 10-11 | Tutorials R 11-12, R 1-2

Instructor: Sarah Star

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group n/a


Course Title: British Literature in the World II: Romantic to Contemporary

Course Code: ENG203H5S | Lecture TR 10-11 | Tutorials R 11-12, R 1-2

InstructorChris Koenig-Woodyard

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group n/a


Course Title: How to Read Poetry

Course Code: ENG204H5F | Lecture M 3-5, W 3-4

Instructor: Brent Wood

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group 1 Literary Theory/Methods


Course Title: Introduction to the Novel

Course Code: ENG211H5F | Lecture M 1-3, W 2-3

Instructor: Thomas Laughlin

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group n/a


Course Title: The Short Story Cycle

Course Code: ENG214H5F | Lecture MWF 9-10

Instructor: TBD

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Group n/a


Course Title: The Canadian Short Story

Course Code: ENG215H5S | Lecture MWF 12-1

InstructorDaniela Janes

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group 5 Canadian Literature


Course Title: Introduction to Shakespeare

Course Code: ENG223H5S | Lecture MW 10-11 | TUT W 11-12, W 1-2

Instructor: Holger Syme

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group 3 Literature pre-1700


Course Title: Children's Literature

Course Code: ENG234H5S | Lecture MWF 9-10

Instructor:  Daniela Janes

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Group n/a


Course Title: Comics and the Graphic Novel

Course Code: ENG235H5S | Lecture M 3-4, W 3-5

Instructor: Chester Scoville

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group n/a

Detailed Description by Instructor: The graphic novel, comic books, sequential art — whatever its name, this popular but long-marginalized art form has been rapidly gaining cultural respectability. Over the past twenty years, artists and writers in this medium have departed from its traditional subject matter to create graphic autobiographies, journalism, political analyses, philosophical arguments and histories, as well as revisiting, critiquing and reinventing such familiar subjects as magic, science fiction and the superhero. This course will examine the range of the current graphic novel, focusing on the medium’s rhetoric, narration and socio-political range.

Selected Major Readings: We will be reading such literary graphic texts as Seth’s George Sprott; Mariko Tamaki and Jillian Tamaki’s This One Summer; and Zoe Maeve’s July Underwater; as well as some mainstream comics such as Moore and Gibbons’s Watchmen. We will also use such resources as Scott McCloud’s Understanding Comics as theoretical and historical background.

First Three Texts/Authors to be Studied: Seth, Moore/Gibbons, Tamaki/Tamaki.

Method of Instruction: Lecture/discussion.

Method of Evaluation: There will be several short writing assignments, leading up to a substantial final essay. Final exam.

Creative writing component: Yes, as an option


Course Title: Detective Fiction

Course Code: ENG236H5F | Lecture MWF 10-11

InstructorDaniela Janes

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group n/a


Course Title: Science Fiction

Course Code: ENG237H5S | Lecture T 3-4, R 3-5

Instructor: TBD

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group n/a


Course Title: Horror Literature

Course Code: ENG239H5F | Lecture T 3-4, R 3-5

InstructorChris Koenig-Woodyard

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group n/a


Course Title: Introduction to American Literature

Course Code: ENG251H5S | Lecture T 12-3

Instructor: Melissa Gniadek

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group 6 American Literature

Detailed Description by Instructor: In recent years we have again been reminded that the ideals espoused in the founding documents of the United States are not, in fact, realities. Inequalities and systemic racism surface again and again as America constantly reassesses its present in relation to its past. While protests have taken on new urgency recently, protest itself is not new. Since the beginnings of the U.S. as a nation, writers have used various genres to point to the limitations of practices of freedom and equality in the U.S. In this course we will examine examples of these writings, from Phillis Wheatley’s late 18th-century poems to Claudia Rankine’s 21st-century prose poem. Along the way we’ll think about how the experiment of the United States is constantly being revised and critiqued. As we investigate forms of protest, some overt and radical and others rather quiet, we’ll carefully close read texts to think about how authors position their readers to raise political and ethical questions. At the same time, we’ll develop a sense of major literary periods and movements that will provide a groundwork for future study of American literature.

Selected Major Readings:
Phillis Wheatley poems 
Hannah Foster, The Coquette
David Walker’s Appeal 
Herman Melville, Benito Cereno 
Charles Chesnutt short stories 
Claudia Rankine, Citizen: An American Lyric

First Three Texts/Authors to be Studied:
Lemuel Haynes, “Liberty Further Extended: Or Free Thoughts on the Illegality of Slave-keeping” 
Phillis Wheatley poems 
Hannah Foster, The Coquette

Method of Instruction: Lecture and discussion

Method of Evaluation: online discussion forum, short writing assignments, essays (4-6 pages), active participation

Creative writing component: No


Course Title: Introduction to Canadian Literature

Course Code: ENG255H5F | Lecture T 11-12, R 11-1

Instructor: Colin Hill

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group 5 Canadian Literature

Detailed Description by Instructor: This course is an introduction to some of Canada’s best writing from pre-confederation to the present. Our writers are from diverse backgrounds and engage the cultural conditions of their evolving country from various perspectives. Class topics will include (but are not limited to) exploration and immigration narratives, Canadian literary history and development, realism, modernism, urban / rural tensions, the artist figure, gender and sexuality, Canadian postmodernism and postcolonialism, multiculturalism, racism and anti-racism, psychological and spiritual self-discovery, and personal, social, cultural, and national identities.

Selected Major Readings: This course consists of short readings from An Anthology of Canadian Literature in English, ed. Bennett and Brown, 4th edition.

First Three Texts/Authors to be Studied: Saukamappee; Samuel Hearne; Susanna Moodie

Method of Instruction: Lecture and discussion

Method of Evaluation

Participation 10% 
Term Paper 35%
Mid-term Test 25%
Final exam 30%

Creative writing component: No


Imagining Nature: Lit. & the Environment

Course Code: ENG259H5F | Lecture MWF 12-1

Instructor: TBD

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group n/a

Course Title: Music and Literature

Course Code: ENG261H5S | Lecture M 1-3, W 1-2

Instructor: Brent Wood

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group n/a


Course Title: Play and Games

Course Code: ENG263H5S | Lecture MW 3-4 | TUT F 2-3, F 3-4

Instructor: Christine Tran

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group n/a


Course Title: Queer Writing

Course Code: ENG269H5S | Lecture T 1-3, R 2-3

Instructor: TBD

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group n/a


Course Title: Toronto's Multicultural Literatures

Course Code: ENG271H5F | Lecture M 6-9

InstructorRaji Soni

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group 2 Race, Ethnicity, Diaspora, Indigeneity


Course Title: Indigenous Literature and Storytelling

Course Code: ENG274H5S | Lecture MWF 10-11

InstructorDaniela Janes

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group 2 Race, Ethnicity, Diaspora, Indigeneity


Course Title: Feminist Approaches to Literature

Course Code: ENG275H5F | Lecture F 1-4

Instructor: Sarah Star

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group 1 Literary Theory/Methods


Course Title: History of Video Games

Course Code: ENG279H5F | Lecture W 9-11 | Tutorials F 9-10, F 10-11

Instructor: Chris Young

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group n/a


Course Title: Critical Approaches to Literature

Course Code: ENG280H5S | Lecture TR 11-12 | Tutorials R 12-1, R 2-3

Instructor: Danny Wright

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group n/a

Detailed Description by Instructor: What does it mean to adopt a "critical approach" to literature, and why is it any better than simply ... reading? Why does it seem that a "theory" is required in order to turn reading into interpretation? In this course we will hold these fundamental questions in mind as we survey a range of theoretical schools and movements, from formalism to deconstruction to Marxism to feminist theory, that have shaped the modern history of literary studies. Our survey will be bookended by clusters of thinkers who have called into question the usefulness of theory and proposed a shift to what we might call, in opposition to the title of this course, "uncritical approaches to literature."

Selected Major Readings: Authors may include Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Barbara Christian, Lee Maracle, Cleanth Brooks, Susan Sontag, Ferdinand de Saussure, Jacques Derrida, Roland Barthes, Barbara Johnson, Karl Marx, Raymond Williams, Sigmund Freud, Judith Butler, Anne Anlin Cheng, Audre Lorde, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, Sara Ahmed, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, Susan Stryker, Joan W. Scott, Saidiya Hartman, Chinua Achebe, Salman Rushdie, Zadie Smith, Stephen Best and Sharon Marcus, Heather Love, Toril Moi.

First Three Texts/Authors to be Studied: Henry Louis Gates, Jr., introduction to Figures in Black Barbara Christian, "The Race for Theory" Lee Maracle, "Oratory: Coming to Theory"

Method of Instruction: Lecture and weekly tutorials

Method of Evaluation: Essays, final exam, and participation

Creative writing component: No


Course Title: Creative Writing

Course Code: ENG289H5F | Lecture MW 1-2 | Tutorials W 2-3, W 4-5 

Instructor: Brent Wood

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group n/a


Course Title: Creative Writing

Course Code: ENG289H5S | Lecture TR 12-1 | Tutorials T 1-2, T 3-4 (ONLINE)

Instructor: TBD

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group n/a

Course Title: Reading for Creative Writing

Course Code: ENG291H5S | Lecture MW 12-1 | Tutorials W 1-2, W 3-4

Instructor: Brent Wood

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group n/a


Third-Year Courses

Fall Term

Winter Term


Course Title: Magical Realism

Course Code: ENG302H5F | Lecture T12-1, R 11-1

Instructor: Chris Koenig-Woodyard

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group n/a


Course Title: Seventeenth-Century Poetry

Course Code: ENG304H5S | Lecture M 1-3, W 1-2

Instructor: TBD

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group 3 Literature pre-1700


Course TitleModern South Asian Literature in English

Course Code: ENG310H5F | Lecture T 3-5, R 3-4

Instructor: Zain Mian

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group 2 Race, Ethnicity, Diaspora, Indigeneity


Course Title: Drama of the Global South

Course Code: ENG317H5S | Lecture F 2-5 

Instructor: Natasha Vashisht

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group 2 Race, Ethnicity, Diaspora, Indigeneity


Course Title: Eighteenth Century Women Writers

Course Code: ENG318H5S | Lecture F 12-3 

Instructor: Terry Robinson

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group 4 Literature 1700-1900


Course Title: Sexuality, Race, & Gender in VG & Gaming Culture

Course Code: ENG319H5S | Lecture M 10-11, W 9-11

Instructor: TBD

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group n/a


Course Title: Austen and Her Contemporaries

Course Code: ENG323H5S | Lecture T 1-3, R 1-2

InstructorDaniel Wright

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group 4 Literature 1700-1900

Detailed Description by Instructor: Around the turn of the nineteenth century, Jane Austen revolutionized the English novel, and in this course, we’ll immerse ourselves in her work, reading five of her major novels in order to understand how and why she intervened so boldly and definitively in the history of this literary genre, and how we continue to feel her influence today. Austen wrote at a time when the novel was a young genre still in search of a clear set of criteria to distinguish it from the romance, the long narrative genre out of which the novel developed. We’ll locate Austen’s work within this situation of flux, paying attention to her formal and thematic innovations: her focus on the ordinary and the everyday as part of the development of novelistic realism; her techniques of characterization and the representation of psychological interiority, including what we now call free indirect discourse; and her shaping of the familiar novelistic structures of the marriage plot and the bildungsroman.

Selected Major Readings: Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, Mansfield Park, Emma, Persuasion

First Three Texts/Authors to be Studied: Austen: Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, Mansfield Park

Method of Instruction: Lecture and discussion

Method of Evaluation: Essays, final exam, participation

Creative writing component: No


Course Title: The Victorian Novel

Course Code: ENG325H5S | Lecture M 2-3, W 1-3

InstructorThomas Laughlin

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group 4 Literature 1700-1900


Course Title: Chaucer Today

Course Code: ENG327H5S | Lecture W 6-9

Instructor: Michael Raby

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Group 3 Literature pre-1700


Course Title: Writing for Games and Narrative Design

Course Code: ENG328H5F | Lecture F 12-3

Instructor: Christine Tran

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group n/a


Course Title: Spy Fiction

Course Code: ENG344H5S | Lecture T 3-5, R 3-4

Instructor: Richard Greene

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group n/a


Course Title: Spy Fiction

Course Course: ENG344H5S | Lecture T 6-9

Instructor: Richard Greene

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group n/a


Course Title: Special Topic in Indigenous Storywork: "Indigenous Feminisms" 

Course Course: ENG348H5S | Lecture W 1-4

Instructor: Maria Hupfield

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group 2 Race, Ethnicity, Diaspora, Indigeneity


Course Title: Toni Morrison: Texts and Contexts

Course Code: ENG351H5S | Lecture T 11-1, R 11-12

Instructor: Anna Thomas

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group 6 American Literature

Detailed Description by Instructor: In this advanced introduction to the work of Toni Morrison, we will encounter masterpieces such as Sula, Song of Solomon, and Beloved and pay particular attention to questions of literary tradition and inheritance, form and narrative voice, and ethics in contexts of oppression. We will read most of Morrison's novels, alongside major essays, in the chronological order in which they were published. Students will be introduced to major themes in African American literary criticsm and theory through close engagement with Morrison's oeuvre and its critical legacy.

Selected Major Readings: The Bluest Eye, Sula, Beloved, Song of Solomon

First Three Texts/Authors to be Studied: “Recitatif,” The Bluest Eye, Sula, selections of nonfiction writing and literary criticism

Method of Instruction: Lectures and seminar-style discussion

Method of Evaluation: 4 short (2 page) argumentative close readings + 2 revision and reflection assignments

Creative writing component: No


Course Title: Black British Literature

Course Code: ENG355H5F | Lecture T 1-3, R 2-3

Instructor: TBD

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group 2 Race, Ethnicity, Diaspora, Indigeneity


Course TitleSpec. Topic in American Lit. (Melville and Hawthorne Rewritten)

Course Code: ENG366H5F | Lecture T 11-1, R 11-12

Instructor: Melissa Gniadek

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group 6 American Literature

Detailed Description by Instructor
The friendship between Herman Melville and Nathaniel Hawthorne is one of the most famous in American literature. While we have only eleven letters between the pair, all from a two-year period and all but one written by Melville to Hawthorne, that correspondence has fueled discussion of their relationship from the Melville revival of the 1920s through the present day. The letters are full of appreciation, desire, and an intense sense of communion. The first postscript of one letter from Melville reads: “P.S. I can't stop yet. If the world was entirely made up of Magians, I'll tell you what I should do. I should have a paper-mill established at one end of the house, and so have an endless riband of foolscap rolling in upon my desk; and upon that endless riband I should write a thousand—a million—billion thoughts, all under the form of a letter to you. The divine magnet is on you, and my magnet responds. Which is the biggest? A foolish question—they are One” (Melville to Hawthorne, November [17] 1851).

This course will introduce students to key texts by Herman Melville and Nathaniel Hawthorne, to scholarly conversations about the relationship between the two authors, and to recent creative engagements with this history and with the gaps in this archive. The course will include an artist residency with members of the ReWritten performance project. This ongoing project weaves together dance, music, visual art, projection, and text to reimagine a queer love story inspired by the lives and writings of these authors. Early in the course we will meet with members of the ReWritten creative team virtually, and then later in the semester we will have in-person, interactive, movement-based workshops with members of the team. At the end of that week-long artist residency the creative team will perform a version of their ReWritten stage play in the MIST Theatre and they will give an artist talk about the ReWritten project.

This course will appeal to students interested in American literature, gender, sexuality, and queer studies, archival studies, drama, dance, and performance, and more. We will close read texts, familiarize ourselves with scholarly conversations, and explore how theatre, dance, movement, and community-engaged projects can enhance the study of literature and vice versa. Students enrolling in this course should expect to hone their reading, writing, and critical thinking skills…and also to move, create, and engage with working artists and performers.

The artist residency and events tied to this course are supported by the UTM Office of the Vice-Principal, Research and Innovation; the JHI Program for the Arts; the Centre for the Study of the United States Bissell-Heyd Research Fellowship; and the tri-campus Departments of English.

Selected Major Readings

  • Herman Melville, Billy Budd, “The Paradise of Bachelors and the Tartarus of Maids,” “Hawthorne and His Mosses”
  •  Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Blithedale Romance

First Three Texts/Authors to be Studied:
Letters between Herman Melville and Nathaniel Hawthorne (1851-1852) Excerpts from Moby-Dick
“The Paradise of Bachelors and the Tartarus of Maids”

Method of Instruction: A combination of discussion, occasional brief lectures, and interactive workshops led by members of the ReWritten creative team.

Method of Evaluation: Short writing assignments, essays, active participation (including in workshops), possible research-creation component, attendance at ReWritten stage show and artist talk.


Course Title: Creative Writing: Poetry [Spoken Word]

Course Code: ENG373H5F LEC0101 | Lecture T 11-1

Instructor: TBD

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group n/a


Course Title: Creative Writing: Poetry

Course Code: ENG373H5F LEC0101 | Lecture R 1-3

Instructor: Richard Greene

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group n/a


Course Title: Creative Writing: Prose

Course Code: ENG374H5S LEC0101 | Lecture M 1-3

Instructor: TBD

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group n/a


Course Title: Creative Writing: Prose

Course Code: ENG374H5S LEC0102 | Lecture W 3-5

Instructor: Brent Wood

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group n/a

Course Title: Special Topic in Writing for Performance (TBA)

Course Code: ENG378H5F LEC0101 | F 11-1

Instructor: TBD

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Group n/a


Course Title: History of Literary Theory

Course Code: ENG380H5S | Lecture M 11-1, W 11-12

Instructor: TBD

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group 1 Literary Theory/Methods


Course Title: Digital Texts

Course Code: ENG381H5F | Lecture T 9-11

Instructor: TBD

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group n/a


Course Title: British Romanticism, 1770-1800

Course Code: ENG385H5F | Lecture T 6-9

InstructorChris Koenig-Woodyard

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group 4 Literature 1700-1900


Course Title: British Romanticism, 1800-1830

Course Code: ENG386H5S | Lecture T 6-9

InstructorChris Koenig-Woodyard

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group 4 Literature 1700-1900


Course Title: Canadian Fiction

Course Code: ENG392HS | Lecture T 11-12, R 11-1

InstructorColin Hill

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group 5 Canadian Literature

Detailed Description by InstructorThis course offers students an exploration of the development of the Canadian novel. We will discuss texts by novelists who engage the cultural conditions of Canada from the early 20th century to the present. Topics will include, but are not limited to, modernism, realism, urban/rural tensions, the Indigenous novel in Canada, the artist figure, gender and sexuality, Canadian postmodernism and postcolonialism, multiculturalism, racism and antiracism, psychological and spiritual self-discovery, various “schools” of Canadian literary theory, and personal, social, cultural, and national identities. Students will be expected to attend regularly and to complete readings thoughtfully and on time. Students are also strongly encouraged to participate in class discussions in a respectful and intellectually rigorous atmosphere. This course aims to build knowledge and appreciation of Canadian writing and to introduce students to a wide range of theoretical, critical, and literary-historical approaches relevant to the study of Canadian and other literatures. Engaged students should expect to come away from the course with a good understanding of the subjects and forms of the Canadian novel and many of its important literary, historical, cultural, and theoretical contexts.

Selected Major Readings:          

1. Sinclair Ross, As for Me and My House
2. Margaret Atwood, Surfacing
3. Michael Ondaatje, In the Skin of a Lion
4. Thomas King, Green Grass, Running Water
5. André Alexis, Fifteen Dogs
6. TBA

First Three Texts/Authors to be Studied: Ross, Atwood, Ondaatje

Method of Instruction:

Lecture / discussion

Method of Evaluation:

Participation 10% 
Term Paper 35%
Mid-term Test 25%
Final exam 30%


Course Title: Canadian Poetry in Context

Course Code: ENG393H5F | Lecture MWF 12-1

InstructorDaniela Janes

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group 5 Canadian Literature


Fourth-Year Courses

Fall Term

  • ENG410H5F Seminar: Critical Game Studies: Topic TBA
  • ENG463H5F Seminar: Literature 1700-1900: "Reading Frankenstein's Reading"
  • ENG472H5FSeminar: Modern/Cont.: "Canadian Comics & The Second World War"

Winter Term

  • ENG424H5S Seminar: Canadian Lit. (Suburban Literatures in Canada)
  • ENG464H5S Seminar: The Story of the Book: "Making, Book Science, and the History of the Book" 
  • ENG471H5Sem: Literature 1700-1900: "Melodrama & More!"

Course Title: Seminar: Critical Game Studies: Topic TBA

Course Code: ENG410H5F | Lecture R 1-3

InstructorChristine Tran

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group n/a


Course Title: Seminar: Canadian Lit. (Suburban Literatures in Canada)

Course Code: ENG424H5S | Lecture T 2-4

InstructorColin Hill

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group 5 Canadian Literature

Detailed Description by Instructor: This course invites students to read and interpret the remarkably diverse, global, contemporary, and often ignored literatures produced in and about Canadian suburbs (including, in our own region, Mississauga, Brampton, Scarborough, etc.). The course will consider both canonical literary representations of the suburban in Canada and an emergent body of writing about suburban space and experience produced largely by new Canadian writers of diverse origins and backgrounds whose histories, life stories, and geographies fit uncomfortably, or not at all, within established and exclusionary narratives of Canadian literature. Participants in the course will read a representative selection of short fiction, two or three novels, and selected short critical materials that offer an interdisciplinary approach to the subject of writing in and about Canadian suburbs; these critical materials are selected to combine innovatively some traditional literary approaches to the suburbs, contemporary cultural studies of suburban life, and recent Canadian and international geographical and sociological theories of suburban spaces. Seminar topics will include (but are certainly not limited to) literary representations of suburban experience, the creative problems and possibilities associated with writing about suburban spaces, the lives and stories of immigrants in the contemporary Canadian “ethnoburb,” various socio-political discussions of suburban life, suburban geographies in relation to the Indigenous land they occupy, urban/suburban tensions and inequalities, the material and real-life conditions that affect the production of suburban literature, and the problematic critical reception of suburban writing by a Canadian literary establishment centred in downtown Toronto. As students engage these topics and readings, they will be encouraged to reflect upon and share their own experiences of living, studying, working, and creating in suburban areas of the GTA.

Selected Readings
Primary sources (short stories and novels) will be drawn from the following list of authors: Margaret Laurence, Carrianne Leung, Douglas Coupland, David Chariandy, Mona Awad, David Bezmozgis, Derek Mascaranas, Souvankham Thammavongsa, Rohinton Mistry, and possibly others.

Secondary sources will include short readings by some or all of the following: Nishanthan Balasubramaniam, Christopher Cheung, Cheryl Cowdy, Judith De Jong, Richard Harris, Rupa Huq, Sunjay Mathuria, James Howard Kunstler, Wei Li, James Onusko, Lara Vaughan, and possibly others.

First Three Texts/Authors to be Studied: TBA

Method of Instruction: Discussion and lecture

Method of Evaluation:

Participation 20%
Short Presentation 20%
Term paper 40%
Midterm Writing Assignment 20%

Creative writing component: No


Course Title: Seminar: Literature 1700-1900: "Reading Frankenstein's Reading"

Course Code: ENG463H5F | Lecture W 1-3

InstructorDan White

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group 4 Literature 1700-1900

Detailed Description by Instructor: Anyone who reads Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and considers how the creature acquires language -- by reading books and by overhearing a book read out loud -- will immediately be struck by the sheer intertextual energy of the novel. In this course, we will first read Frankenstein. Then we will read everything the creature reads in Frankenstein, along with other works that Shelley weaves into her tale. Then we will read Frankenstein again. Along the way, we will also watch and discuss five awesome movies that “read” Frankenstein too!

Selected Major Readings: Selections from or the entirety of Milton's Paradise Lost, Goethe's The Sorrows of Young Werther, Volney's The Ruins of Empires, Plutarch's Lives, Genesis, Coleridge's “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner,” Wollstonecraft's The Wrongs of Woman: or Maria, Percy Shelley's “Mont Blanc,” and Byron's Manfred; Films -- Ex Machina, Blade Runner, Get Out, Never Let Me Go, Her

First Three Texts/Authors to be Studied: Frankenstein, Genesis, Paradise Lost

Method of Instruction: Discussion-based seminar

Method of Evaluation: Three "Creature Features" (short, creative essays written in the voice of the creature about his reading, 15% each); one term paper (40%); class participation (15%)

Creative writing component: No


Course Title: Seminar: The Story of the Book: "Making, Book Science, and the History of the Book" 

Course Code: ENG464H5S | Lecture W 10-12

InstructorAlex Gillespie

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group 1 Literary Theory/Methods


Course TitleSeminar: Literature 1700-1900: "Melodrama & More!"

Course Code: ENG471H5S| Lecture M 3-5

InstructorTerry Robinson

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group 4 Literature 1700-1900

Detailed Description by Instructor: This course offers an exciting opportunity to explore and learn about melodrama—one of the most popular and pervasive genres in Western theatrical history—from its origins in late eighteenth-century France to its flourishing in nineteenth-century England and America. We’ll read, discuss, and analyze an array of melodramas by authors such as Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Thomas Holcroft, Joanna Baillie, Dion Boucicault, and Henrietta Vinton Davis. Along the way, we’ll examine the forms, conventions, and techniques of melodrama; its sensational effects; and the often challenging concerns they raise around issues of class, race, gender, and sexuality. We’ll also investigate the changing contexts and modes of dramatic performance over the more than 100 years that melodrama dominated Western stages and ponder why it is that melodrama maintains its cultural hold on us even to this day.

Selected Major Readings: Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Thomas Holcroft, Joanna Baillie, Dion Boucicault, and Henrietta Vinton Davis and other playwrights

First Three Texts/Authors to be Studied

  • Jean-Jacques Rousseau
  • Thomas Holcroft
  • Joanna Baillie

Method of Instruction: Lecture, Discussion, In-Class Activities

Method of Evaluation: Active Participation; In-Class Presentation; Critical Analysis Essay; Research Project

Creative writing component: No


Course Title: Seminar: Modern/Cont.: "Canadian Comics & The Second World War"

Course Code: ENG472H5F| Lecture M 3-5

InstructorChester Scoville

For the UTM calendar description of this course, click here

Group n/a

Detailed Description by InstructorDuring the Second World War, a home-grown comics industry sprang up in Toronto, Montreal, and Vancouver, giving young readers the opportunity to read about Canadian heroes and adventurers fighting injustice overseas or at home. These new comic books, created largely by young artists and published by fledgling companies, forged a national audience by appealing to ideas of Canadianness tied to membership in Empire, rootedness in the Northern landscape, and a social imaginary that differed from that represented by American comic-book heroes. This course will take a critical and historical view of some of these Canadian comics, looking at their publication history, their reception, and their narrative and cultural techniques and purposes. We will make use of available reprints, of the extensive free comics archive held at Library and Archives Canada (much of which has been digitized for convenient use) and, where possible, of the Bell Comics archive at Toronto Metropolitan University. What did the characters in these comics represent to their young readers, and how can we use them to interpret the ideas about Canada that were developing during that time? How, furthermore, can we see the legacy of these ideas continuing today, long after most of these superheroes have been forgotten?

[N.B. Some of these comics contain depictions of race and gender that were common in the wartime environment and comics medium of the 1940s which would not be considered acceptable today.]

Selected Major Readings: We will be focusing on comics from Bell Publications, such as Triumph Comics, Dime Comics, and Wow Comics. We will also use such historical resources as Ivan Kocmarek’s Heroes of the Home Front and John Bell’s Invaders from the North.

First Three Texts/Authors to be Studied: Triumph, Kocmarek, Dime.

Method of Instruction: Seminar and discussion.

Method of Evaluation: Participation, Presentation, Short analyses, Final project

Creative writing component: Yes, as an option