2021 Summer Courses

Books

*The Course Schedules below are subject to change once the new Academic Calendar is published as well as pending enrolment pattern changes. Detailed course descriptions by instructors are added when available and are also subject to change.

**Please consult the Registrar's Time Table for mode of delivery for courses.


First-Year Courses


Course Title: Effective Writing

Course Code: ENG100H5F | Lecture MW 9-12

Instructor: Siobhan O'Flynn

This course provides practical tools for writing in university and beyond. Students will gain experience in generating ideas, clarifying insights, structuring arguments, composing paragraphs and sentences, critiquing and revising their writing, and communicating effectively to diverse audiences. This course does not count toward any English program

Group n/a

Detailed Description by Instructor: This course is designed to provide students with necessary foundational skills for academic writing and to foster effective communication, by honing precision and clarity. The course will focus on the fundamentals of clear articulate prose, analytical thinking, expository and persuasive writing, pre-writing, editing, and revision, and provide an overview of the value and pitfalls of digital research in detailing a topic and/or developing an argument. Students will engage with writing as a process through multiple short exercises (individual and group; online & solo), directed brainstorming, and peer review. This course is not a basic writing course as to spelling and sentence structure.

Critical Writing Guide: G. Graff & C. Birkenstein, They Say, I Say, 4th Edition 

Method of Instruction: Lecture, class discussion, and in-class activities
Method of Evaluation: 2 short draft essays, short essays, peer reviews, final essay.


Course Title: Effective Writing

Course Code: ENG100H5S | Lecture TR 1-4

Instructor: Thomas Laughlin

This course provides practical tools for writing in university and beyond. Students will gain experience in generating ideas, clarifying insights, structuring arguments, composing paragraphs and sentences, critiquing and revising their writing, and communicating effectively to diverse audiences. This course does not count toward any English program

Group n/a


Course Title: How to Read Critically

Course Code: ENG101H5S | Lecture TR 9-11 | Tutorials TR 11-12, TR 1-2 

InstructorThomas Laughlin

This foundational course serves as an introduction to a wide range and variety of methods for literary and textual analysis, giving students a set of interpretive tools they can use to analyze texts in English classes and beyond. Emphasis will be on developing close, attentive reading skills as ways of thinking not just about, but through texts, and on deploying these skills effectively in essays and discussions. The class will draw on literary works from a variety of countries, centuries, genres, and media. We recommend that students considering a Specialist, Major, or Minor in English take this course.

Group 1 Literary Theory/Methods


Second-Year Courses


Course Title: British Literature in the World I: Medieval to Eighteenth-Century 

Course Code: ENG202H5F | Lecture MW 9-11 | Tutorials MW 11-12, MW 1-2

Instructor: Liza Blake

This course serves as an introduction to influential texts that have shaped British literary history from Beowulf and Chaucer to Shakespeare, from Milton and Behn to Burney. Students will focus on questions such as the range and evolution of poetic forms, the development of the theatre and the novel and the emergence of women writers. The course will encourage students to think about the study of English literatures in relationship to history, including the history of world literatures.

Exclusion: ENG202Y5

Prerequisite: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits.

Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Group n/a

Detailed Description by Instructor:
What is a world, and what does it mean for something like “British” literature to be “in” it? This course, a foundational course for the English major, offers an introduction to the major authors of almost nine centuries of British and English literature. We will see how something like “British” or “English” literature emerges out of the slow historical colonizations and recolonizations of the British Isles. But we will also see how the literature coming out of these isles imagines and describes other worlds within and without itself. We will focus especially on texts that imagine travel to other words (lands of faerie; distant lands occupied by monsters; utopias that imagine better societies; the New World of the Americas; other planets ruled by women scientists), and will think about how different genres (medieval theater, metaphysical poetry, sci-fi novels) project both author and reader beyond the worlds they typically inhabit.

Throughout the course, we will also question what it means to read literary texts as part of a broad historical survey, considering especially how modern understandings of the nature of history might warp our perceptions of the past. As a result, we will not only consider the “origins” of British literature but also question what it means to have an origin at all. We will embed the literary works we read in their historical contexts, but also consider the way each presents its own understanding of history, examining in particular the ways that literary texts situate themselves in times and places.

Selected Major Readings:
Medieval, early modern, and eighteenth-century literature, including Old English riddles, Bede History, Sir Orfeo, Marie de France’s Lays, Margery Kempe, Mandeville’s Travels, More’s Utopia, Cavendish’s Blazing World, Equiano’s Interesting Narrative, Aphra Behn’s Oroonoko, and poetry by Geoffrey Chaucer, Queen Elizabeth, William Shakespeare, Mary Wroth, John Donne, Hester Pulter, John Wilmot, Aphra Behn, and Phillis Wheatley

First Three Texts/Authors to be Studied:
Bede (English Historiography), Geoffrey of Monmouth (British Historiography), Gerald of Wales (Irish Historiography)

Method of Instruction:
Taught via fully online lectures and tutorials; both lectures and tutorials will be interactive and will run synchronously, with asynchronous options.

Method of Evaluation:
Papers, quizzes, smaller creative and analytical assignments, engaged participation


Course Title: British Literature in the World II: Romantic to Contemporary

Course Code: ENG203H5S | Lecture TR 1-2 | Tutorials TR 1-2, TR 3-4

Instructor: Chris Koenig-Woodyard

An introduction to influential texts that have shaped British literary history from the Romantic period to the present, covering developments in poetry, drama and prose, from William Wordsworth to Zadie Smith and beyond. The course will address topics such as revolution and war; the increasing diversity of poetic forms; the cultural dominance of the novel; romanticism, Victorianism, modernism and postmodernism; feminism; colonialism and decolonization; the ethnic and cultural diversity of Anglophone literature in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries; literature and sexual identity; the AIDS epidemic; and technology and the digital age. The course will encourage students to think about the study of English literatures in relationship to history, including the history of world literatures.

Exclusion: ENG203Y5

Prerequisite: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits.

Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Group n/a


Course Title: The Short Story

Course Code: ENG213H5F | Lecture TR 9-12

Instructor: Daniela Janes

This course explores shorter works of 19th- and 20th-century writers. Special attention will be paid to formal and rhetorical concepts for the study of fiction as well as to issues such as narrative voice, allegory, irony and the representation of temporality.

Prerequisite: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits.

Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Group n/a

Detailed Description by Instructor:
This course examines the development of the short story from the nineteenth century to the present. We will explore stories drawn from a range of national literatures, including several works that will be studied in translation. The goal of the course is to develop your knowledge of the literary short story by examining major writers, and to build a sense of historical and theoretical context. We will consider the short story in terms of the formal features of the genre, and will seek to define some of the essential characteristics of the short story as more than, simply, a story that is short.

Selected major readings: The recommended course text is The Norton Anthology of Short Fiction, Shorter 8th Edition. Some of the authors to be covered include Baldwin, Carver, Chekhov, Chopin, Faulkner, Hawthorne, Hemingway, Joyce, Kafka, Kincaid, Lahiri, Le Guin, Mansfield, de Maupassant, Melville, Munro, Oates, Poe, and Woolf.

First three texts/authors to be studied: Hawthorne, Young Goodman Brown; Poe, The Fall of the House of Usher; Melville, Bartleby, the Scrivener.

Method of instruction: This class will be conducted fully online and will include a combination of synchronous and asynchronous elements. Students should anticipate investing time in preparing readings, engaging with course material independently and collaboratively, contributing to online discussion, and completing several substantial writing projects.  

Method of evaluation: written projects, online discussion, and engaged participation.


Course Title: Children's Literature

Course Code: ENG234H5F | Lecture MW 1-4

Instructor: Siobhan O'Flynn

A critical and historical study of poetry and fiction written for or appropriated by children, this course may also include drama or non-fiction. The authors studied may include Bunyan, Stevenson, Carroll, Twain, Alcott, Nesbit, Montgomery, Milne, Norton, Fitzhugh and Rowling.

Prerequisite: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits.

Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Group n/a

Detailed Description by Instructor: Richard Van Camp, Dogrib Tłı̨chǫ writer of the Dene nation from Fort Smith, Northwest Territories, has said, “stories are good medicine.” The stories we hear as children give us road maps and role models for life’s challenges and these can be empowering or constraining. We will consider key aspects such as the classic themes of maturation and escape, the construction and performance of gender, the significance of animal protagonists, children’s & YA serial fiction, and the often didactic function of children’s literature. We will also attend to the importance of historical and cultural contexts, and how literature for younger people engages with systemic oppression, race, and gender. We will trace through the works studied the way that different writers articulate the moral core of children’s literature, that sets the clarity insight and commitment to values of the child/youth protagonist against the moral prevarications of adults.

Selected major readings (a number of texts from the following):

B. Potter, The Tale of Peter Rabbit; C. Perrault, selection of Fairy Tales (online);
Brothers Grimm, selection of Fairy Tales (various tales, online);
The Thousand and One Nights (various tales, online);
L. Carroll, Alice in Wonderland, Norton, ISBN 978-0393932348
A.A. Milne, Winnie the Pooh, McClelland & Stewart, ISBN 9780142404676
M. L’Engle, A Wrinkle in Time, ISBN 978-0-312-36754-1
Philip Pullman, The Golden Compass ISBN 978-0-440-41832-0
Angie Thomas, The Hate You Give ISBN 978-0062498533
Cherie Dimaline, The Marrow Thieves ISBN 9780439023528

Critical Writing Guide: G. Graff & C. Birkenstein, They Say, I Say, 2nd Edition (free download/ PDF Quercus)

First Three Texts/Authors to be Studied: Perrault, Grimms, The Thousand and One Nights

Method of Instruction: Lecture, class discussion, and in-class activities

Method of Evaluation: short assignments, short essay, long essay, in-class activities


Course Title: Fantasy Literature

Course Code: ENG238H5F | Lecture TR 1-4

Instructor: Chris Koenig-Woodyard

This course focuses on fantasy literature, film and television, and draws on a wide range of critical, cultural and theoretical approaches. As it explores the magical and supernatural, it may consider such genres as alternative histories, animal fantasy, epic, fairy tales, magic realism and swords and sorcery. Authors and texts covered will survey the history of fantasy across American, British and Canadian literature, and may include Beowulf, Butler, Carroll, Gaiman, Le Guin, Lewis, Martin, Ovid, Rowling, Shakespeare, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Swift and Tolkien.

Prerequisite: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits.

Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in any 100-level ENG or DRE course (except ENG100H5) may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Group n/a

Detailed Description by Instructor: This course explores fantasy literature from a variety of theoretical and critical approaches. As we read (text and graphic) novels that treat the magical, the supernatural, epic, fairy tales, and magic realism, we will be interested in intersections between fantasy and a wide range of themes: gender and sexuality, culture, politics, philosophy, and race—to name a few.

Required Reading Note

I have NOT ordered books through the UTM Bookstore. Please purchase copies of the texts from the following

  • Kindle and Paper copies: Amazon
  • Electronic copies: Google Play and Comixology

1. Tolkien, J.R.R., Hobbit ISBN: 978-0261102217
Amazon: 
https://www.amazon.ca/Hobbit-J-R-Tolkien/dp/0261102214/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=978-0261102217&qid=1596579810&sr=8-1
Google Play: 
https://play.google.com/store/books/details/J_R_R_Tolkien_The_Hobbit?id=U799AY3yfqcC

2. Kelly, Joe, I Kill Giants. ISBN: 978-1-607069850
Amazon: https://www.amazon.ca/I-Kill-Giants-Joe-Kelly/dp/1607060922/ref=sr_1_3?dchild=1&keywords=i+kill+giants&qid=1618327931&sr=8-3
Google Play: https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Joe_Kelly_I_Kill_Giants?id=4bZ_AwAAQBAJ
Comixology (You can save a PDF backup to your computer):
https://www.comixology.com/I-Kill-Giants/digital-comic/98469?ref=c2VhcmNoL2luZGV4L2Rlc2t0b3Avc2xpZGVyTGlzdC90b3BSZXN1bHRzU2xpZGVy

3. Adeyemi, Tomi, Children of Blood and Bone ISBN: 978-1250170972 Amazon: https://www.amazon.ca/Children-Blood-Bone-Tomi-Adeyemi/dp/1250170974/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=978-1250170972&qid=1596580020&sr=8-1
Google Play: https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Tomi_Adeyemi_Children_of_Blood_and_Bone?id=vuguDwAAQBAJ

4. Readings posted to the Quercus

First Three Texts/Authors to be Studied: The Hobbit, I Kill Giants, Children of Blood and Bone

Method of Instruction: Lecture and Discussion

Method of Evaluation: Essays (with a creative writing option)

Website: Portal


Course Title: Creative Writing

Course Code: ENG289H5S | Lecture MW 11-1 | Tutorials MW 1-2, MW 3-4

Instructor: Kateri Lanthier

Students will engage in a variety of creative exercises, conducted across a range of different genres of literary writing.

Prerequisite: Open to students who have successfully completed at least 4.0 full credits.

Students who do not meet the prerequisite but are enrolled in ENG101H or ENG102H5 or ENG110H5 or ENG140Y5 or DRE/ENG121H5 and DRE/ENG122H5 may petition the department in writing for approval to take the course. See the guidelines for written petitions on the department website.

Group n/a


Third-Year Courses

  • ENG316H5S Special Topic in Modern and Contemporary Literature (Virginia Woolf and Illness)
  • ENG371H5F Special Topic in World Literature (Theatres of Resistance)
  • ENG375H5F Editing Literary Texts
  • ENG385H5S Editing Literary Texts 

Course Title: Special Topic in Modern and Contemporary Literature (Virginia Woolf and Illness)

Course Code: ENG316H5S | Lecture MW 1-4 

Instructor: Daniela Janes

A concentrated study of one aspect of modern or contemporary literature or literary culture, such as a particular subgenre or author, specific theme or the application of a particular critical approach.

Prerequisite: 2.0 credit in ENG, including ENG202Y5 or ENG203Y5, and 4.0 additional credits

Group n/a

Detailed Description by Instructor: This class will undertake a reading of two novels and an assortment of shorter works to investigate questions related to the literary representation of illness, mortality, and the body. As we read Woolf’s work in the context of our own historical moment living through a global pandemic, we will consider the way Woolf writes about illness in the aftermath of the 1918-19 influenza pandemic. Elizabeth Outka’s monograph, Viral Modernism (2019), invites us to consider what she calls “the pandemic’s spectral presence” and to take note of “the changes it produced on the streets, in domestic spaces, within families, and in the body.” Through our reading and analysis of Woolf’s work, this course will offer students new ways to think about the representation of illness, the body, the mind, the experience of time, and the “spectral presence” of the influenza pandemic in modernist literature.

Selected Major Readings: Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway, To the Lighthouse, and On Being Ill, and selections from Elizabeth Outka’s Viral Modernism.

First three texts/authors to be studied: Outka, Viral Modernism (Chapter One); Woolf, On Being Ill, Mrs. Dalloway.

Method of instruction: This class will be conducted fully online as a synchronous lecture/discussion class. Students should anticipate investing time in preparing readings, engaging with course material independently and collaboratively, contributing to online discussion, and completing several substantial writing projects.

Method of evaluation: written projects, discussion, and engaged participation.


Course Title: Special Topic in World Literature (Theatres of Resistance)

Course Code: ENG371H5S | Lecture WF 1-4

Instructor: Natasha Vashisht

A concentrated study of one aspect of postcolonial literature or literary culture, such as a particular genre, author, period, regional or national context, or theme, or the application of a particular critical approach.

Prerequisite: 1.0 credits in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Group 2 Race, Ethnicity, Diaspora, Indigeneity


Course Title: Editing Literary Texts

Course Code: ENG375H5F | Lecture TR 1-4

Instructor: Elisa Tersigni

Students will learn the basics of literary editing for different readerships: the course will cover such topics as the selection of a base text; treatment of variants; creation of paratext; design and layout; proofs and proofchecking; and the differences between print and digital media. [36L]

Prerequisite: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits; or ENG289H5/ENG291H5

Group n/a


Course Title: British Romanticism 1770-1800

Course Code: ENG385H5S | Lecture WF 2-5

Instructor: Chris Koenig-Woodyard

This course covers the early Romantic period in British Literature. Students may read novels such as Frances Burney's Evelina; plays such as Richard Brinsley Sheridan's School for Scandal; writing on the French and American Revolutions; William Blake's Songs of Innocence and of Experience; and ballads by William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Hannah More and Mary Robinson.

Exclusion: ENG308Y5

Prerequisite: 1.0 credit in ENG and 3.0 additional credits.

Group 4 Literature 1700-1900

Detailed Description by Instructor: In surveying “early” Romanticism, which is typically comprised of the first generation of British Romantic writers such as Blake, Burney, Coleridge, Hemans, More, Robinson, and Wordsworth, we will explore intersections of literature and culture. Thus we will explore these and other writers’ roles in shaping (and being shaped by) a number of central themes, and political and cultural movements and events, that include revolution and reform (political and literary); legal and natural rights (age, gender, racial, natural/legal): Empire and Imperialism; The Slave Trade and Abolition—among others. In doing so, we are interested in investigating humanity and identity—along age, gender, race, national, and cultural lines—as we reflect on the very theory and practice of studying of English literature, periodization, and canonization.

Selected Major Readings: I have NOT ordered books through the UTM bookstore. You can purchase paper copies through Amazon and Broadview and e-copies through Google Play. Hard copies from Broadview will include a shipping fee; overall, the least expensive option will be Google Play.

Black et al., editors. The Broadview Anthology of British Literature Volume 4: The Age of Romanticism. 3rd Edition https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Joseph_Black_The_Broadview_Anthology_of_British_Li?id=n9QvDwAAQBAJ

First Three Texts/Authors to be Studied: TBA

Method of Instruction: Lecture and Discussion

Method of Evaluation: Essays and Written Assignments