Nash Turley

nash

My research is on the evolutionary ecology of plant-herbivore interactions, more specifically, the causes and consequences of contemporary evolution. While it is generally believed that plants and herbivores shape each other’s trait evolution over long time scales, our understanding of contemporary evolutionary patterns and processes in plant-herbivore interactions is limited. My thesis test three general questions: 1) What ecological factors and traits drive evolution in plant herbivore interaction? 2) What traits evolve due to interactions between plants and herbivores? 3) Does contemporary evolution in plants and herbivores feedback to affect ecological processes?

Contact
nash[at]nashturley.org

Personal Website
nashturley.org





Publications

  1. Turley NE, Odell WC, Schaefer H, Everwand G, Crawley MJ, Johnson MTJ. Contemporary evolution of plant growth rate following experimental removal of herbivores. American Naturalist. Accepted.
  2. Evans DM, Turley NE, Tewksbury JJ. Habitat patch shape, not corridors, determines herbivory and fitness of a model plant species. Ecology.
  3. Woods EC, Hastings AP, Turley NE, Heard SB, Agrawal AA. Adaptive geographical clines in the growth and defense of a native plant. Ecological Monographs.
  4. Hersch-Green EI, Turley NE, Johnson MTJ. 2011. Community genetics: what have we accomplished and where should we be going? Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London: Series B. 366(1569):1453-1460.