White, Richard

Sessional LecturerHistory

Contact Information

Room: 
EH 207
Mailing Address: 
3359 Mississauga Rd., Erindale Hall
City: 
Mississauga
Province: 
Ontario
Postal Code: 
L5L 1C6
Office Hours: 
M 2-3
White

Richard White is an independent historian and author, and longstanding part-time instructor in Canadian history at UTM. He received his PhD from the University of Toronto in 1995 with a dissertation on the careers of two nineteenth-century Canadian civil engineers, subsequently published as Gentlemen Engineers: The Working Lives of Frank and Walter Shanly (UT Press, 1999). He published other work in the social and cultural history of Canadian engineering, including, as part of the University of Toronto History Project, The Skule Story: The University of Toronto Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering, 1873-2000 (published by the Faculty, in association with UT Press, 2001).

In 2003 he was appointed Research Director of the Toronto-based Neptis Foundation, a private foundation devoted to research in urban and regional affairs, where he developed a new interest in the history of urban planning. He published two historical papers for the foundation (see www.neptis.org), then undertook a program of his own research in Toronto planning history that continues to this day. Now a recognized expert in the field, Professor White has recently published articles in the US-based Journal of Planning History, The American Review of Canadian Studies, and The Canadian Historical Review. His comprehensive history of Toronto postwar planning, Planning Toronto: The Planners, The Plans, Their Legacies, 1940-80 (UBC Press,2016) recently received the Ontario Historical Society's Fred Landon Award as the best book on local or regional history in Ontario published in the past three years.

Professor White has taught an introductory survey of Canadian history, an intermediate-level course on the history of postwar Canada, and courses at various levels on the history of Toronto and the GTA.

He blogs on Toronto planning history at www.torontoplanninghistorian.com.