New Courses

The Historical Studies Department has added a total of 16 new courses to our list of course offerings. Below is a detailed description of the new courses that will be available as early as this academic school year 2016-17.

DTS301H5 Topics in Diaspora and Transnational Studies

Course Description: 

An examination of issues on Diaspora and Transnational Studies. Content in any given year depends on instructor.

 

DTS401H5 Advanced Topics in Diaspora and Transnational Studies

Course Description:

An in-depth examination of issues on Diaspora and Transnational Studies. Content in any given year depends on instructor.

 

HIS210H5 Introduction to Digital Humanities

Course Description:

What is Digital Humanities? We explore the field'‚s debates, platforms, tools, projects, and critical perspectives, as well as its current core practices: digital exhibits, digital mapping, text analysis, information visualization, and network analysis. We discuss the relationship between technology and knowledge production in historical and critical perspective.

HIS211H5 Screening History

Course Description:

This course explores the relationship of media U film, ˝ television and new visual technologies U to history: as ˝ historical representations, as sources of history, and as history itself. The course examines the impact of popular representations of history on screen and the controversies that emerge over these constructions of the past.

HIS212H5 The History of Capitalism

Course Description:

This course historicizes capitalism and all of the subcategories that derive from this mode of production: labour, management, the commodity chain, marketing, advertising, finance, exchange value, and the multinational corporation, to name but a few. Students will be introduced to classic texts as well as to more recent work that uses historical methods to study the social, cultural, environmental, gendered, and ethical aspects of economic life under capitalism. The course takes a global perspective, and the focus will range from examining the historical development of capitalism in Canada, the United States, Latin America, Asia, Africa, and Europe.

HIS213H5 A History of the Present

Course Description:

This course takes as its starting point current world events of global significance. We focus on 3-4 flashpoints/crises/events shaping contemporary global politics and culture, and move back in time to understand how current events have been shaped by longer histories of power, inequality, conflict and contestation.

*Offered this academic year

HIS285H5 Politics of Asia Pacific War Memories

Course Description:

This course examines how Japan, China, Taiwan, Korea and the US try to remember the Asian Pacific War. It will particularly focus the bitterly contested representations of war atrocities such as the Nanjing Massacre, the comfort women system, and the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

HIS321H5 Medieval and Early Modern Scotland

Course Description: 

This course examines the political, social, cultural, and religious history of Scotland during the medieval and early modern periods. Topics include the Anglo-Norman impact, the Wars of Independence, Stewart monarchy, the growth of towns and trade, Highlands and Lowlands, the medieval Church, the Protestant Reformation, and Union with England.

HIS325 Modern African History

Course Description:

Looking at the last one hundred years of modern African history, this course will examine the consolidation of colonial societies; transformations in gender, sexuality and identity politics; the roots of ethnic patriotisms, racial ideologies and African nationalisms; the role of violence in colonial and postcolonial governance; and the contemporary in historical perspective.

HIS425H5 Global Intellectual History: Asia Africa in the 20th Century

Course Description:

This seminar explores 20th-century political culture and the circulation of ideas and thinkers. With a particular focus on Africa and Asia, we examine the politics of race, religion, class, and gender in their transnational historical contexts. Students are exposed to key analytical concepts, including hegemony, traveling theory, decolonization and Orientalism.

RLG211H5  Introduction to Religion, Media and Popular Culture

Course Description:

How does religion shape popular culture? How does popular culture shape religion? This course traces a history of these questions from the early modern period through the twenty-first century by looking at fairs and folk culture; mass broadcast media like radio, film, and television; and the rise of digital culture. Topics covered vary by semester, but could include religious comic books, televangelism, mass-mediated religious violence, online pilgrimage, digital occultism, etc.

*Offered this academic year

RLG411H5 Advanced Topics in Religion, Media, and Culture

Course Description:

A critical exploration of selected topics concerning the relationships among religion, media and culture. The focus in any given year may be on a particular religious tradition or on a broader thematic question. Assigned readings typically include a combination of visual and written cultural texts, as well as works of cultural and social theory. Content in any given year depends on instructor.

 

WGS102H5 Reading and Writing in Women and Gender Studies

Course Description:

Using key feminist texts, this course advances students thinking, reading and writing in the discipline of Women and Gender Studies. The emphasis is placed on the development and application of interdisciplinary skills in the interpretation, analysis, criticism, and advocacy of ideas encountered in Women and Gender Studies.

*Offered this academic year

WGS340H5 Black Feminisms: Diasporic Conversations on Theory and Practice

Course Description:

This course examines how Black Feminisms are theorized, produced and practiced, by predominantly Black women scholars, activists and cultural producers located in the diaspora U Canada, the United States and the ˚ Caribbean.

 

WGS343H5 Course Title The Montreal Experience: Sex and Gender in la Cité

Course Description:

This course examines how gender and sexuality intersect with factors such as nationhood, language, politics, religion, geography, and the arts in Quebec. After six classroom sessions, the class will travel Montreal for 4-5 days, where they will visit museums, cultural institutions and attend guest lectures at various institutions. This experiential learning opportunity allows students to engage in deeper learning to see the issues and histories they have been studying come to life.

 

WGS345H5 Genealogies of South Asian Feminisms

Course Description:

This course examines the histories of activism for and by women in South Asia (India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka) from the colonial period to the present. Topics include colonialism, the Partition of 1947, war, religion, development, labour, nationalism, and the family/reproductive rights.

*Offered this academic year