Energy-saving tips

These actions may seem small, but when everybody takes part, the savings are significant. The people who are ultimately responsible for energy use on campus are the end-users: students, faculty, and staff. The best, most efficient, and most cost-effective way to reduce energy consumption on campus is to use it wisely.

For students:

  • Don’t open your window when the heat is on! Turn down the thermostat instead.
  • Turn off the lights when you leave the room.
  • Shut off your computer when you’re not using it. Contrary to popular belief, this is NOT bad for it and may actually prolong the computer’s life.
  • Enable power management settings on your computer so that it goes to sleep or standby mode after 15 minutes of inactivity. Do not use screen-savers; they keep the monitor working at full power, wasting energy.
  • Unplug cell phone chargers, TVs, and other electronics when you’re not using them. These devices continue to draw current even when they’re not being used (this is sometimes referred to as “leaking Compact fluorescent light bulbenergy”, “phantom power”, or “vampire load”).
  • Put on a sweater instead of cranking up the heat.
  • Use compact fluorescent light bulbs. They use 75% less energy than an incandescent bulb, last 10 times longer, and provide very good light quality. Please be aware though, that they require special disposal at the end of their life (see more information at The Office of Energy Efficiency). Home Depot provides compact fluorescent bulb recycling free of charge. See their website.
  • If you’re in the market for a new computer, consider a laptop instead of a desktop. Laptops use about 10 times less energy.
  • Use revolving doors when they are available (e.g. Student Centre). They save energy by allowing less heated/cooled air to escape from the building.
  • Don’t use automatic door openers unless you actually need them.
  • If you only have one floor to go, use the stairs instead of the elevator. Not only does this save energy, but it’s better for your health.

For faculty and staff:

  • Turn off your office lights when you leave.
  • Avoid using personal space heaters if at all possible.
  • Turn off your computer at night, during long meetings, and over weekends. In general, if you’re going to be out of the office for longer than an hour, turn off your computer. Contrary to popular belief, this is NOT bad for it and may actually prolong the computer’s life.
  • Enable the power management settings on your computer so that it goes to sleep after 15 minutes of inactivity. Do not use screen-savers; they keep the monitor working at full power, wasting energy.
  • Use natural light as much as possible. Try turning off your electric lights when natural light is sufficient.
  • If you have a desk lamp, use a compact fluorescent light bulb. They use 75% less energy than an incandescent bulb, last 10 times longer, and provide very good light quality. Please be aware though, that they require special disposal at the end of their life (see more information at The Office of Energy Efficiency). Home Depot provides compact fluorescent bulb recycling free of charge. See their website .
  • If you’re in the market for a new computer, consider a laptop instead of a desktop. Laptops use about 10 times less energy.
  • Turn off printers, photocopiers etc. when they’re not being used. Most printers consume a significant amount of energy, even when they’re not actively printing.
  • Don’t use automatic door openers unless you actually need them.
  • Turn off classroom lights when leaving.
  • If you only have one floor to go, use the stairs instead of the elevator. Not only does this save energy, but it’s better for your health.
  • When purchasing new office equipment, look for the most energy-efficient alternatives.