Minutes: November 27, 2007

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MISSISSAUGA

Report of the ACADEMIC AFFAIRS COMMITTEE of Erindale College Council meeting held on Tuesday, November 27, 2007 in Room 3129, South Building.

Present: A. Lange (in the Chair), I. Orchard, U. Krull, G. Averill, J. Poë, N. Copeland, K. Rehner, A. Bendlin, S. Baumann, M.L. Smith, H. Gunz, L. Thomson, S. Munro
Regrets: A. Erosa
In attendance: Sameer Al Abdul-Wahid, Lynn Snowden, Len Brooks, Michael Lettieri, Robert Johnson

1. Minutes of the previous meeting (October 23, 2007)

The report of the previous meeting was approved.

2. Reports of Committees and Officers

a) 2008-09 Curriculum Reports:

i. Humanities – Prof. Leslie Thomson

Professor Thomson gave a summary of the Humanities Curriculum Report, which is attached hereto as Appendix A.

Professor Thomson reported that the European Studies specialist and major were being discontinued due to low and declining enrolment in the program. This change had been outlined in the “Stepping Up” divisional academic plan. In the Philosophy Specialist program, it is proposed that the minimum required grade to enter the program be raised, from 70% to 73%. With this change, the philosophy department wanted to ensure that students have a balanced preparation in the central areas of philosophy, by requiring that they take a sufficient number of courses in the major areas as outlined in the report. Regarding course changes, Professor Thomson noted that the only significant change was the transfer of several courses from the Department of Historical Studies, to the Department of French, German and Italian (FGI), pending FGI’s name change to the Department of Language Studies. Courses that fall into this category include Elementary Persian and Introductory Sanskrit.

She noted that the remaining changes in the humanities curriculum report constituted minor, housekeeping changes.

It was duly moved and seconded,

THAT the Humanities curriculum report be approved. (L. Thomson / B. Katz)

The Chair opened the floor to questions:

In response to a member’s question about how it was possible to add a net of 9 courses in history with no resulting resource implications, Professor Johnson explained that the courses in question are to be offered in rotation, in alternate years, so that the net number of courses per year will not change. The member also commented that the Specialist Program in Language Teaching and Learning only lists 7 required credits. Professor Lettieri, explained that the program is a combined specialist in Italian and French and that the report will need to be clarified to reflect that.

Another member pointed out that in the Classical Civilization Major and Minor, the rationale incorrectly states that PHL300H5 is being added as a Classics substitute; DRE420H5 is the substitute and should therefore appear in the report in a revised rationale.

The motion was carried.

ii. Sciences – Prof. Mary Lou Smith

Professor Smith gave a summary of the Sciences Curriculum Report, which is attached hereto as Appendix B.

She reported that a new specialist in Geocomputational Science was being proposed. This program allows the strengths of two departments, Geography and Mathematical and Computational Sciences, to join into one formal degree that allows students interested in geographic information systems, remote sensing, and computer science to pursue a specialist degree that combines two demanding fields under less onerous circumstances than obtaining a double major in both.

Professor Smith explained that currently, the Biology Major is a Type I program, which has no enrolment limits. The department is proposing to change that by requiring students to complete 4.0 credits, including two specified courses in Biology and to have a CGPA of at least 2.0. The minor program has been left as a Type I program. This change will also bring the department in line with other science majors at the university, most of which have either a CGPA or other requirement.

Professor Smith concluded by noting that the remaining changes in the sciences curriculum report constituted minor changes, such as additional courses for new faculty hires and housekeeping changes.

It was duly moved and seconded,

THAT the Sciences curriculum report be approved. (M.L. Smith/J. Poë)

The Motion was carried.

iii. Social Sciences – Prof. Hugh Gunz

Professor Gunz summarized the Social Sciences curriculum report, which is attached hereto as Appendix C.

Professor Gunz reported that U of T Mississauga proposes to change the degree earned for students registered in the Management Specialist program (ERSPE2431) from an HBA (Honours Bachelor of Arts) to a BBA (Bachelor of Business Administration). Entrance requirements, curriculum, and standards remain the same as they were for the HBA. Professor Gunz explained that the BBA is recognized throughout North America as one of two vehicles for undergraduate management studies, the other being the older Bachelor of Commerce degree. The BBA is a widely used name for business and management degrees (6 of 11 undergraduate business degrees in south central Ontario are BBAs). It provides more immediate recognition among potential students and employers and allows U of T Mississauga to exploit more fully the current growth of interest in business programs.

Professor Gunz concluded by noting that no other new programs were being proposed and that the remaining changes in the report constituted minor changes, such as additional courses for new faculty hires and housekeeping changes.

It was duly moved and seconded,

THAT the Social Sciences curriculum report be approved. (H. Gunz/B. Katz)

The Motion was carried.

b) New course offerings in the Diploma in Investigative & Forensic Accounting Program

(DIFA) – Len Brooks, Director

Professor Brooks referred members to the handout of new course offerings in the Diploma in Investigative & Forensic Accounting Program (DIFA), which is attached hereto as Appendix D.

The DIFA program was transferred from the Rotman School of Management to U of T Mississauga on July 1, 2007. Professor Brooks explained that as a result, the DIFA courses, which have been offered since 2001/02, need to be approved in their current form as described in the document circulated. A new course designator “IFA” will replace “MGT”, and more readings and increased instruction in research methodology will be incorporated into the program.

It was duly moved and seconded,

THAT the proposed changes to existing courses in the Diploma in Investigative & Forensic

Accounting Program be approved as described in the attached document. (L. Brooks/I. Orchard)

The motion was carried.

c) Transfer of the Master of Management and Professional Accounting Program (MMPA) from the Rotman School of Management to the University of Toronto Mississauga

Professor Krull referred members to the memorandum on the motion to transfer the MMPA program to U of T Mississauga; it is attached hereto as Appendix E.

Professor Krull explained that since 1996, the MMPA program has been offered at U of T Mississauga under the graduate supervision of the Rotman School of Management. While the academic oversight of the program resides at the Rotman School, the MMPA program office at U of T Mississauga handles all operational aspects. On average, 3 to 5, half courses per year have been supplied by Rotman School faculty, reimbursed at full cost. He added that all program revenues are retained at U of T Mississauga.

He reported that an OCGS appraisal committee, in its review undertaken during the 2006/07 academic year, found the program to be highly respected, well structured and successful. The review recommended that the university and the Rotman School should either take the program back to St. George and make it a focus or consider re-labeling the MMPA program as a non-Rotman program. Subsequent to the review, it was agreed that with the creation of the new Professional Graduate Program Centre at U of T Mississauga, the appropriate academic oversight mechanism is in place to follow through on the original intent to establish the MMPA program as a graduate program at U of T Mississauga. Professor Krull noted that the Rotman School has committed to continuing to make available teaching resources to the MMPA program at full cost, not exceeding five half-courses per year. He added that the Rotman School of Management has approved the proposed transfer.

Professor Krull acknowledged that some students may feel disenfranchised from the program, without the association of Rotman with the program name, however the next cohort of students have been made aware of the change and their reactions will be assessed.

It was duly moved and seconded,

THAT the transfer of the Master of Management and Professional Accounting Program (MMPA) from the Rotman School of Management to the University of Toronto Mississauga, effective with the MMPA class of 2010, which will enter in June 2008, be recommended to Erindale College Council for approval. (U. Krull/G. Averill)

The Chair opened the floor to discussion.

A member asked whether recruitment materials had been revised as of yet in view of the proposed change. Professor Krull explained that the use of the Rotman name had been removed from all recruitment and advertising materials, and students who have already received materials have been advised of the change.

Professor Krull emphasized that the MMPA program is considered to be a very strong program and is targeted for significant expansion and revenue generation.

A member commented that this change could be seen as the Rotman School of Management severing its relationship with U of T Mississauga; the member expressed her concern for the future health of the MMPA program, without the backing of the Rotman brand. Professor Krull noted that the quality of the program would be maintained, but without the Rotman branding that has historically been associated with it. He added that the MMPA program anticipates a drop in the applicant pool as a result of this change, but it is unclear at this point how significant that drop will be, until the MMPA program has a chance to grow and develop its own brand.

Another member commented that the Rotman School of Management is not in the market of producing accountants and that therefore this separation between the two programs seemed logical.

The motion was carried.

3. New Business:

a) Expansion of second teachable options in the Concurrent Teacher Education Program

(CTEP) – Gage Averill, Dean

Professor Averill noted that the CTE program introduced its first class in September of 2007. When the program was being formulated, it had been decided that it would proceed with a limited range of anchor and second teachable options, based on demand in secondary schools and the interest of participating departments. The enrolment of 52 students into the first class fell short of the initial target of 90 students and a review of the program has revealed that the limited number of choices of second teachable subjects detracted from the program’s appeal. The proposed second teachable options of Theatre, Drama and Performance Studies; Art/Art History; Geography; History; and Physics, seem to be subjects that are of interest to prospective students and are predicted to be areas of demand among employers.

It was duly moved and seconded,

THAT the second teachable options in the Concurrent Teacher Education program be expanded to include Theatre, Drama and Performance Studies; Art/Art History; Geography; History; and Physics, as described in the attached memorandum. (Appendix F) (G. Averill / I. Orchard)

The motion was carried.

b) Name Change for the Department of French, German and Italian – Prof. Michael

Professor Lettieri reported that Department of French, German and Italian (FGI) proposes to change its name to the Department of Language Studies. The department will continue to specialize and conduct research in its core areas of French, German, Italian, and linguistics. It is proposed that simultaneously, FGI will oversee and direct programming for a wider range of languages, such as Arabic, Persian, Latin, Sanskrit, Hindi/Urdu and Chinese, previously offered in the department of Historical Studies. It is anticipated that that the new language options will be offered in sequences ranging from one to four courses, depending on need and availability of instructional resources. There are no plans at this time to introduce minor, major, or specialist programs in the new language options.

Professor Lettieri noted that the Department of FGI has a proven track record of high quality teaching and its expertise in language teaching pedagogy, and is well-positioned to provide leadership in language teaching to the benefit of the entire campus. He added that at a recent retreat, the Department of French, German and Italian embraced this vision and articulated a global approach to language study programming, resulting in the proposal to change its name to the Department of Language Studies.

It was duly moved and seconded,

THAT the name of the Department of French, German and Italian be changed to the Department of Language Studies. (M. Lettieri/L. Thomson) (Memorandum: Appendix G)

The Chair opened the floor to discussion.

In response to a member’s query, Professor Lettieri answered that there were currently 38 students enrolled in the Latin class, and that the Arabic and Persian courses were doing as well in terms of student interest. He added that the department was currently conducting searches for lecturers in Urdu, Sanskrit, Arabic and Chinese.

A member asked what the implications of this proposed change are for faculty. Professor Lettieri explained that sessional lecturers exist for most of the language courses in question.

In response to a member’s question about the reason “language studies” was chosen as the new name, Professor Lettieri explained that the new phrase embraces the various aspects of linguistics, culture, language that are included in the department and “studies” was thought to be a broad term, offering flexibility.

A member asked if faculty in the department were happy with the name change proposal. Professor Lettieri commented that initially, “French” was to remain as part of the department name, but the current proposal was arrived at subsequent to long discussions at a retreat. He added that faculty within the department are pleased with the decision.

In response to a member’s question about whether there are any plans to add more languages to the department’s offerings in the near future, Professor Lettieri answered that it would depend on demand and available resources.

The motion was carried.

There being no other new business, the Chair announced that the next meeting of the Academic Affairs Committee was scheduled for Tuesday, January 15, 2008.

The meeting adjourned at 4:15 p.m.

Secretary ____________________________ Chair ______________________________