Research

How does a plant survive in an ever changing environment? The research focus in our lab is on the molecular and physiological acclimation and adaptation of photosynthesis, and carbon and isorpenoid metabolism in plants to abiotic stress. Within this field we are particularly interested in understanding these processes in evergreen conifers. For Canada the response of conifer forests to climate change is an important ecological and economic issue, as it holds 25% of the world’s boreal conifer forests. It is proposed that climate change might increase e.g. the carbon sink of conifer forests. However, some of these forests might also be negatively affected by increased land surface air temperatures. Heat-related effects including the disruption of regulatory processes or water stress inhibit plants from properly exploiting the increased length of the growing season. Changes in growth and productivity of these ecosystems will directly affect their economic value, their ability to sequester carbon as well as sustainable management practice or biofuel production.

Current Projects

CoAdaptree

SpruceUp

Drones for breeding better white spruce

DougAdapt (funded by German Science foundation, DFG) find out more...

Response of trees to climate change (Discovery Grant, funded by NSERC ) find out more...

Screening tools for assessing adaptation of conifers to future climate (Early Researcher Award, Ontario Ministry of Research and Innovation) find out more...

Research Facility for Global Change Molecular Physiology of Trees (CFI/LOF) find out more...

Photosynthesis and carbon transfer in future forests (Connaught New Researcher Award Program)  find out more...

  Resources

Experimental warming array at Koffler Scientific Reserve

see live images from the Phenocam (in collaboration with Lisa Wingate and the European Phenology Network coordinated at the University of Cambridge)

 

Ingo does some final adjustments

Ingo installing and adjusting the camera of the Phenocam network