Hot Student Papers

Identification, characterization and expression of a receptor for the unusual mysosuppressin in the blood-feeding bug Rhodnius prolixus

26 Nov 2014 - 8:23am
Rhodnius prolixus

Oh my, my oh, oh my, I feel my-oh-suppressed. Or I might feel that way if I had the same myosuppressin just discovered in the kissing bug. Former PhD student DoHee Lee and former NSERC USRA Tyler James (Lange Lab) recently published “Identification, characterization and expression of a receptor for the unusual mysosuppressin in the blood-feeding bug Rhodnius prolixus” in Insect Molecular Biology. Do Hee and Tyler recently characterized the gene for the receptor of an unusual peptide in Rhodnius prolixus.

The Proteomic Landscape of the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Clock Reveals Large-Scale Coordination of Key Biological Processes

17 Nov 2014 - 9:17am
white mouse within a graphic representation of a 24 hour clock

Do you know what time it is? I have no idea either, but proteins in the Cheng Lab can tell you the time every 8, 12 and 24 hours! Recent MSc graduate Neel Mehta, NSERC USRA/BIO481 Abhilasha Patel and former PDF Peng Zhang (Cheng Lab) collaborated with scientists at U Ottawa in their recent paper “The Proteomic Landscape of the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Clock Reveals Large-Scale Coordination of Key Biological Processes” in PLoS Genetics. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, they interrogated the proteome of the mouse Suprachiasmatic Nucleus (SCN - the central pacemaker that generates 24h rhythms) across the day-night cycle. They found that the expression of many proteins in the SCN is time-of-day-dependent but not necessarily circadian (i.e.

Investigation of the juxtamembrane region of neuronal- Synaptobrevin in synaptic transmission at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction

31 Oct 2014 - 2:08pm
neuron

Damn that’s hot! That is what you’d feel if you touched a fire, but how do those signals travel from your fingers to your brain? Recent Ph.D. graduate Colin DeMill, along with other Stewart lab members Xinping Qiu, Marta Kisiel and Alanna Bolotta (Stewart Lab), have been teasing apart the molecular basis of neuron membrane fusion in Drosophila. Colin et al’s latest paper “Investigation of the juxtamembrane region of neuronal-Synaptobrevin in synaptic transmission at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction” was recently published in Journal of Neurophysiology. Neurons regulate the release of

Sex biased immunity is driven by relative differences in reproductive investment

23 Oct 2014 - 12:30pm
an insect on a flower

Gentlemen, brace yourselves, because you are more likely to get sick than your female counterparts – cough, cough, cough. At least that is what theory would have us believe in sexually selected species where males compete more than females for mates. Recent Ph.D. graduate Crystal Vincent (Gwynne and Baker labs) recently published a paper that provides a novel twist in testing this prediction. Crystal published “Sex biased immunity is driven by relative differences in reproductive investment” in Proceedings of the Royal Society of London: Series B.

Functional characterization and expression analysis of the myoinhibiting peptide receptor in the chagas disease vector Rhodnius prolixus

14 Oct 2014 - 3:14pm
Rhodnius prolixus

What gets your oviducts fluttering? Well, we don’t have oviducts, but if we had oviducts like the chagas disease vector Rhodnius polixus, than the answer would be clearer because of recent results out of the Lange and Orchard labs. Former PhD/PDF Jean-Paul Paluzzi and current PhD student Laura Sedra (Lange and Orchard Labs) recently published “Functional characterization and expression analysis of the myoinhibiting peptide receptor in the chagas disease vector Rhodnius prolixus” in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology. In this paper, they clone and characterize the myoinhibiting peptide (MIP) receptor in the blood-sucking bug, R. prolixus. This family of peptides is known to inhibit visceral muscle contraction.

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