Hot Student Papers

Efficient Transposition of the Youngest MITE Family of Yellow Fever Mosquito in Yeast

30 Mar 2015 - 9:37am
mosquito

Do you have MITEs in you? The answer is almost certainly “yes” if we are talking about Miniature Inverted Repeat Transposable Elements (MITEs). MITEs are extremely abundant in plants and animals, including the genome of Yellow Fever Mosquito. Their dramatic amplification in genomes is difficult to understand because their transposase is unknown in most cases. PDFs Isam Fattash, Chia-Ni Lee and Kaiguo Mo (Yang Lab) recently addressed this problem in their paper “Efficient Transposition of the Youngest MITE Family of Yellow Fever Mosquito in Yeast” published in the FEBS Journal.  Following the recent discovery of the youngest MITE family Gnome and its elusive ancestral element, they detected efficient transposition of Gnome in yeast.

Darwinian balancing selection: Predation counters sexual selection in a wild insect

16 Mar 2015 - 4:04pm
Tree crickets

I’m too sexy for my head, too sexy for my head, so sexy I’m dead! (Adapted from Right Said Fred)

Biomarker use is associated with reduced clinical trial failure risk in metastatic melanoma

3 Mar 2015 - 8:41am
Daniel Rubinger and Sarah Hollman

The complexity of modern medicine sometimes makes it difficult to know if drug treatments are doing their intended job. MBioTech students Daniel Rubinger and Sarah Hollman (advisor Jayson Parker) took this problem head on in their recent paper “Biomarker use is associated with reduced clinical trial failure risk in metastatic melanoma” published in Biomarkers in Medicine. Dan and Sarah looked at how new drugs are tested in melanoma and traced them through various stages of clinical trial testing between 1998 and 2013. They compared drugs that used a biomarker (e.g. “personalized medicine” if you will) versus drugs that did not use a biomarker, in identifying patients who will be treated with the drug in question for the disease.

Recurrent loss of sex is associated with accumulation of deleterious mutations in Oenothera

17 Feb 2015 - 11:54am
primrose

Happy Darwin Day! Yes, that is right, Charles Darwin is 206 years old today! If that is not enough, love is in the air and that is why this week’s Hot Student/Postdoc paper is so apropos. Former Postdoc Jesse Hollister (Johnson & Wright Labs) has experimentally shown that sex is good for your health, at least if you are a plant. Jesse published “Recurrent loss of sex is associated with accumulation of deleterious mutations in Oenothera” in Molecular Biology and Evolution. He studied the evening primrose genus Oenothera where there have been >20 independent transitions from a sexual to a functionally asexual genetic system. After using Illumina based RNA-seq to sequence ca.

Myinhibitors controlling oviduct contraction within the female blood-gorging insect, Rhodnius prolixus

3 Feb 2015 - 8:30am
Rhodnius prolixus

What is the best way to recover from a long and tiring snow day? Curling up with the latest Hot Student Paper OF COURSE! Well, lucky for you Ph.D. student Laura Sedra (Lange Lab) recently published “Myinhibitors controlling oviduct contraction within the female blood-gorging insect, Rhodnius prolixus” in General and Comparative Endocrinology. If you are not an animal neurophysiologist you might not have known that muscle fibers are coordinated by stimulatory and inhibitory neuropeptides that result in the overall contraction and relaxation of the tissue. This paper focuses in on three specific neuropeptide families that are commonly classified as myoinhibitors: A-type allatostatins (FGLa/AST), B-type allatostatins (MIP/AST) and myosuppressins (MS).

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