Archaeological Fieldwork at UTM (ANT318H5F)

Students perform shovel test on soil

Registration for Field School is now CLOSED.

The objective of the UTM Archaeological Fieldwork course (ANT318H5F) is to give students a basic grounding in the techniques and methods employed by archaeologists to extract data from an archaeological site and to process these data in the laboratory. Because archaeological data collection is time-consuming and requires learning a number of different techniques, the first part of the course will consist of two weeks (80 hours) of field instruction, usually during the last two weeks of August.

Instruction during the field session in August deals with:

  • excavation practices
  • data recording
  • flotation
  • mapping
  • photography

The fall term is devoted to weekly two-hour laboratory sessions that focus on washing and cataloguing the artifacts excavated during the summer.
 

Students examine artifacts in the teaching lab

Location

The August fieldwork generally takes place at a site within commuting distance of the UTM campus or on the UTM campus. Students are individually responsible for transportation; a car pool will be organized from the UTM campus if an off-campus site is selected. 

The Fall term lab classes take place on the Uof T Mississauga campus.
 

Course delivery timeline

Students must be available for both the August fieldwork and the laboratory classes in the Fall term. Participation in August fieldwork is a required part of the course. This course is typically offered every year.

  • Fieldwork takes place from 9 am to 5 pm on Monday, August 21 to Friday, September 1, 2017
  • Weekly two-hour laboratory classes are held during the fall term. 
     

Fees and supplies to be purchased

  • Students are only charged Fall Registration for the course; there are no summer tuition charges.
  • Students must submit a non-refundable ancillary fee of $35.00 CAD to the UTM Anthropology Department prior to enroling in the course on ROSI/ACORN. (The ancillary fee covers the cost of minor field school supplies. All excavation equipment will be supplied.)
  • Students must buy CSA-approved steel-toed work boots and work gloves.
     

Students work to sift soil

Eligibility and prerequisites

  • Prerequisite: ANT(200H5, 201H5)/200Y5
  • Students must have the approval of the UTM Anthropology Department before enrolling in the course on ROSI/ACORN. Approval will be based on number of credits completed, area of concentration, academic standing, course background and/or previous courses. 
  • Students who have successfully completed ANT318H5F may apply for the advanced version of the course, ANT418H5F. Students may not enrol in ANT418 without completing ANT318 or an equivalent accredited field school.
  • This field school course is only open to University of Toronto students. First priority will be given to UTM students.
     

Application and enrolment process

  1. Request departmental approval to enrol in the course by submitting the online Field School Application Form. Note: the online form is only open when applications are being accepted.
  2. Check your @mail.utoronto.ca email account for the results of your application. If you receive departmental approval to enrol in this course, you must complete the steps below in order to complete your enrolment.
  3. If you are approved to enrol in the course, submit the $35.00 CAD ancillary fee to the Departmental Assistant in HSC300. We can only accept cash (exact amount as change is not provided) or cheque (cheques must be made payable to "University of Toronto"). A receipt for payment will be provided to you.
  4. Enrol in the course via ROSI/ACORN (when enrolment is open). You must submit your ancillary fee payment before you can enrol in the course on ROSI/ACORN.
     

Students work at an excavation site

Questions?

If you have any questions about the Archaeological Fieldwork Field School or the application process please contact the Departmental Assistant at secretary.utmanthro@utoronto.ca.

 

Did you know? 

ANT318 at UTM was featured in a New York Times article! Read the article on the New York Times website.